Fri
Jun 15 2012 1:00pm

Did She or Didn’t She?: The Case of Alice Crimmins 47 years later

Forty-seven years ago, Alice Crimmins was front page news. Her story was my first exposure to true crime. Between 1965 and 1977, Alice Crimmins was twice tried for the murders of her children, five-year-old Eddie Jr. and four-year-old Missy. On July 14, 1965 the children went missing from their first-floor apartment in the Kew Gardens neighborhood of New York City; Alice accused her estranged husband Eddie of taking them. He denied doing so and called the police to report the children missing. Detective Gerard H. Piering was put in charge of the case, which proved unfortunate for Alice. He was a devout Catholic, father of six children, and disliked Alice on sight. When the police officers arrived at her apartment, they were surprised by the way Alice looked; she was in tight-fitting pants, white high heels, teased red hair, and wearing lots of makeup. The makeup was an effort to cover the scars of adolescent acne, but the police saw it as the actions of a cold-hearted murderess. Piering apparently said to his partner, “You interview the guy. I’ll take the bitch.” Detective Piering did not take notes or photograph the crime scene, failing to follow long established guidelines for suspected homicides. There was not a shred of evidence to support a case against Crimmins, but the police believed her guilty.

On the day the children went missing, word came in that Missy was found strangled in a vacant lot. The detectives took Alice to the scene without alerting her to what she would see; they wanted to study her reaction. She fainted when she saw the strangled Missy but did not cry on the ride back home, at least not until the cameras started snapping pictures and her silent shock turned into hysterics. Several days later Eddie Jr.’s badly decomposed body was found.

Described in the press as a “sexpot” or a “sexy redhead,” 28-year-old Alice Crimmins was out clubbing and hooking up just days after her children were found. The police found these actions suspicious, but one might argue that her grief drove Alice Crimmins out of the home where she had lived with her children. The police followed and harassed Crimmins, and even though she looked for work under the name Alice Burke, her notoriety followed her causing her to lose several jobs. Alice’s phones were tapped, which she soon figured out. She took to picking up the phone and saying “Hi boys, drop dead.” Eighteen months after the murders, an anonymous tipster wrote to the DA saying that at 2 a.m. on July 14, the night of the murder, a small woman and an unidentified male were seen carrying a wrapped bundle and small child into a car.

The police were able to identify the tipster as Sophie Earomirski who identified the woman she saw as Alice Crimmins. On September 11, 1967, Alice Crimmins was arrested for the murder of Missy. She became the “Sexpot on Trial,” and her affairs were mentioned during the trial apparently as evidence to support a murder charge. At the description of Missy’s corpse, Alice Crimmins sobbed uncontrollably. Hearing Earomirski’s testimony, Alice yelled out, “You liar; you liar; you liar.”

In one of the most highly publicized trials of its time Alice Crimmins was convicted of manslaughter. Crimmins fell into a faint and was hospitalized for two weeks. She spent 24 days in jail before her new lawyers had her conviction overturned. However, six years after the death of her two children, she was on trial again in March of 1971. This time she was convicted of first degree murder for her son and manslaughter for her daughter. In 1973 her convictions were overturned due to tainted statements by the prosecutor. The DA appealed the rulings and Alice was sent back to jail for manslaughter. While in jail, she married Anthony Grace, the man once believed to be her accomplice. In November 1977, amidst much controversy, Alice Crimmins was paroled.

Alice Crimmins was never presumed innocent. She had been found guilty by the press and public long before she ever went to trial, and many observers believed that she was on trial for her sexual exploits rather than the murders. There was never any evidence to tie her to the crimes and no other suspect was considered. The detective work was shoddy, the police prejudiced, and the witnesses unreliable.

Did Alice Crimmins get away with murder? I’ve always believed she was innocent. What do you think?

 


Susan Amper, author of How to Write About Edgar Allan Poe, still mourns the loss of her Nancy Drew collection.

Read all posts by Susan Amper on Criminal Element.

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60 comments
1. s.amper
Interesting similarities between how the Alice Crimmins case was handled and the Lindy Chamberlain dingo baby killing case as discussed in today's NY Times. Sexy women are guilty until or even if proved innocent.
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/16/opinion/shes-innocent-were-guilty.html?_r=1&ref=opinion
Clare Toohey
2. clare2e
Fascinating, Susan! I don't have a hunch on Alice, but it's happened before that oddballs with backgrounds or tastes that put them outside the big bell curve of what investigators usually see can get unfair treatment and even end up in jail. I'm thinking of the West Memphis Three. To solve crimes, investigators play percentages of what most likely happens and pursue those leads first, which often proves to be the best approach. But combine something that looks too unusual--and therefore suspicious--with someone(s) in local authority failing to give the guaranteed presumption of doubt, and it can go very badly for an oddball. People whose community finds them strange are not by definition harmless, but if they're unsympathetic and innocent, and crimes happen close by, they'd better have a good lawyer's number. Roust the unusual suspects!
3. CW Padden
I believe she was innocent too. She was well and truly 'set up' for those murders. I must also admit that her behaviour following the murders was a bit unusual to say the least and she didn't do herself any favours on that score. However she was a mother who lost 2 children to murder and that must be umimaginable if you haven't shared that experience. I hope she continued to live a peaceful and contented life once she was paroled.
4. Maggie Marple
I was a teenager at the time of this crime and I always believed her husband killed their children to revenge himself on her. They were separated and she was dating another man and her husband would sneak into the basement of the house and listen to them making love upstairs. When she discovered the children missing she called him immediately and snapped "Where are the children?" as if she knew he must have taken them. During the trial he was by her side as if concerned for her. Why she never said he might have been responsible for their murders has always been the big question for me. Perhaps she felt guilt - as women often do - that she drove him to it with her wild sexy ways.
5. MICHAEL OLSON
I have the memory of Alice Crimmins deeply set in my memories even though I was only a child. Very few people remember her or her trials. I asked older people(new yorkers) about their memories about this case and they have no memorys, I remember the strong feelings about her sexual life by adults around me. I have to wonder what really did happen? If not the Adult Crimmins then who? Two children strangled and someone, a murderer, roaming the streets. Has this ever turned into a cold Case?
One wonders what became of the two adult crimmins and the price they paid emotionally.
6. PinkLady
I was a child when the death of these two children happened. I remember following the trials and always feeling Alice Crimmins was innocent. I even did a paper on this in college back in the late 70's. Is there a possibility that she brought a "date" home and when she fell asleep after a night of drinking, this person took advantage of the situation and was a child predator? Back then, the public didn't here too much about things like this. I have always been curious about this. Is it a cold case?
7. s.amper
I don't know if the case has ever been officially deemed a cold case. However, the police did such a shoddy job of evidence gathering at the crime scene that it would be almost impossible to solve today without a confession. Like you PinkLady, I was a child when this story was in the papers, and I too always believed Crimmins innocent. She later married but did not have more children.
8. SmallWorld
She married Anthony Grace and there is no doubt in my mind she needed to get rid of her children so she could marry him. He didn't want children and he was a very wealthy man who could take very good care of her. He passed away years ago and she didn't inherit much because he left most to his only living son.
9. Min
I was young at the time and living in the Bx. My mom was convinced Alice killed her children. I'd love for someone to open the case file and take another look; finally find out who killed Eddie and Missy if not Alice? And isn 't Alice owed an answer about who murdered her children? Do you know if Alice or Eddie Crimmins are still alive?
10. JDR
I always wondered about this case. I had only heard of it because in the John Waters film Female Trouble. One of the characters says "Remember what happened to Alice Crimmins".. and now I know..
11. Rick Hendricks
This happened just before I entered the Air Force. I knew Alice andher husband from a place called Tropical Gradens. Also, I knew Mike Clifford, the first officer onnthe scene. In conversations I had with him, he sworenshe did it. Idisagred because I thought it was one of the disreputable men she dated.
Clare Toohey
12. clare2e
I'd love to know the truth. Sometimes as people get older, they start telling their secrets, so maybe someday, there'll be new information to consider.
13. BML84
Interestingly, you appear to have left out the most objective, and important, piece of evidence against Crimmins.
The autopsy on the little girl showed the food digested, and it's stage in the digestive process, showed a timeframe completely at odds with the account Alice gave, something she refused to back down from as it completely punctured her alibi.
Personally, I'd say its a better than average chance she did kill them, but doubt I could convict her on evidence gathered.
More worrying toe is the recent revisionism of this and the Sylvia Likens case in which the main women are seen as 'victims' of social mores (some group always is in any stage of history), whilst playing down the fact that both were cold, self-absorbed and manipulative people.
Oddly, although this would be seen as virtual proof of guilt in male offenders, somehow we downplay or disregard these character aspects when it comes to female offenders.
david hartzog
14. dlhartzog
I remember the case at the time, and later read a nonfiction book about it, as well as Dorothy Uhnak's novel, The Investigation, which became a Kojak movie. I tend to think she was innocent, but just don't know, who else was there? It reminds me of the Sam Shepard case.
15. s.amper
I don't know that "we" find "cold, self-absorbed and manipulative" men as virtually guilty of a crime, but the police and several juries certainly viewed Alice Crimmins in that light. Despite being imprisoned three times, Crimmins was set free. Clearly the courts believed she had not been fairly convicted.
16. Caligula
I'm a guy, and the LAST thing that would be on my mind, after my 2 children were brutally murdered and I'd just seen their dead bodies, would be to go out and get drunk and laid. It sounds like her children were interfering with her partying and whoring around and she just decided to get rid of them.
17. Dee64
A person had told they were raped when alone at work. No one they knew would come to pick them up. What did they do? Went to a bar to drink away the memory? How is that a strange response to an event too painful to handle?
18. Dee64
Amazing how the victim committed the crime. Police sure do have to work hard don't they. Bums
19. Jen
I don't believe Alice murdered her children, her actions after their deaths was somethingto be ddesired but that was probably her way of coping and dealing with losing her kids. Everyone grieves differently, right or wrong. I think her husband did it.
Kat Atak
20. Katatak
I believe she was innocent but wonder how the case would be handled and/or tried if it occured today. I think she'd never be arrested, much less tried and found guilty. I have no clue who did it, possibly the husband. Alice was found guilty for her lifestyle and actions as much as any possible "proof of guilt".
21. Knee
I think there should have been way more investigation of the husband.
Seriously, what kind of deviant tells someone he exposed his genitals to little kids!?
Joking or not.
Add to the fact his wiretapping her sexual encounters with other men among his other perverted acts against her.
The cops thought her wearing make-up and slacks made her guilty compared to the actions of her husband!?
The way the cops handled this case is almost as disgusting as the crime.
Kat Atak
22. Katatak
She wore "a lot of make-up" regularly, even just to hang out in the yard, to hide acne scars. It was just what she did. Not sure why that would make her guilty, but this was 1965 (I remember those days well!) and folks were even more judgemental then than now, if possible. Her lawyer didn't do too good a job, IMO.
23. Stacia
The most interesting thing about this case, to me, is that the witness who was sure she'd seen Crimmins, her boyfriend, the kids and a dog leave the area about 2AM. This witness would testify with deliberately sensationalized stories. She loved the attention and reportedly would pump her hands in the air after testifying, cheering herself off. But then a family came forward and admitted they were the couple, kids and dog this witness had seen -- and the wife of this couple looked similar to Crimmins! How all this didn't put any reasonable doubt in the jury's mind is beyond me.
24. merope
Alice Crimmins would have been burned at the stake centuries ago. She was seen as the evil temptress by this nutty cop and she never had a chance. She was convicted by 12 married men. One of them admitted that her behavior got her convicted. In other words, there was no evidence against her except dangerous male views of what a woman should be. It has always been thus.
25. merope
Alice Crimmins would have been burned at the stake centuries ago. She was seen as the evil temptress by this nutty cop and she never had a chance. She was convicted by 12 married men. One of them admitted that her behavior got her convicted. In other words, there was no evidence against her except dangerous male views of what a woman should be. It has always been thus.
26. caligirl
I think that she is innocent. That cop persicuted her by her personal , the heavy make up, tight cloths, ect, my oppinion , I think that that cop took one look at her and fell in love, and just couldn't stand that he couldn't be in her life. Those damn cops should've investigated the father of the children, that man was a sicko, he just couldn't let her go, so if he couldn't have her nobody should. In those day's women were suppose to be barefoot and pregnant and in the kitchen not in bars, SHE WAS FOUND GUILTY BECOUSE OF HER LIFE STYLE.
27. s.amper
I agree that Crimmins was found guilty based on her lifestlye. It would be nice to know more about the prurient interest of Det. Gerard H. Piering. His outlook appears to have more to do with voyeurism than detective work.
28. John F Early
Watched ID's account of the story last night. Previous to watching it, I reviewed the story on Crime Library or some such web site. I'd forgotten the year it happened, but remembered the crime well. If I remember correctly, my mom and dad and/or I -- I forget exactly now -- thought it was the mob-connected boy friend (good-looking swarthy guy in construction-- something like that) who wanted Alice herself, but didn't want her children. After that, we didn't know exactly "who done it".
29. s.amper
John,

I remember that theory about the mob connected boyfriend, but it seems to be unfounded since it's not mentioned in anything recent about Alice Crimmins.
30. John Jay
Oh please, spare me the liberal feminist woe is me victim mentality crap. She was a whore who was more concerned with getting loaded and laid than tending to her motherly duties. She would lock her kids in their room so she could have sex with her MANY boyfriends which shows a patern of abuse. What kind of mother goes slutting around town after her kids are murdered? No doubt in any rational person's mind that this tramp killed her children but of course rationality is something feminists and liberals lack greatly. She should have got the chair.
31. Sam Farnell
I was living and working in New York during that time and actively followed the case through the media. New York Post, Daily News and Mirror, Journal American Newspapers and local TV. I felt she was guilty. Mostly based on the manner in which she carried herself before and during the trail. She presented the image from day one that life was always about her and nothing else matter. Most important in her life was socializing at the the local pub with guys, guys, guys......
32. walkalot
My father was a cop (not in New York) during the 1960's and always said committed the murders the reason being one of her boyfriends had mob connections and there might have been some mob-related talk that the kids overheard and could be repeated so that was why they were murdered. I was a pre-teen at the time so I did not think to ask him who he heard this from.
david hartzog
33. dlhartzog
Leaving sarcasm and personal attacks aside, we will probably never know the truth, since the cops did such a lousy job, prejudging and basing the case on personal opinions. I don't think any of us can say for certain if she was guilty or innocent.
34. rdella
Im not sure who killed these children but the fact that Alice's exhusband was asking police alot of questions, regarding the bruises and marks left on their bodies when found, would have me seriously investigating why? Most parents would have been too distraught to want to know these horrible details. How could the cops get away with bringing the mother to the site of her dead daughter and not tell the mother where they were going? If the father was out in his car watching Alice"s appartment, why did he not see anything? Such as someone moving the bodies. Too many unaswered questions to have convicted this woman. Where is the proof? It is all circumstantial.
35. TruthBeHeard
Those who keep saying her "whoring around town" shows her f guilt, apparently know nothing about psychological grieving. Many individuals attempt to suppress reality of a traumatic event, by pretending it never occurred. In my opinion that's what Alice was doing. If she had been responsible for these crimes, do you honestly believe she wouldve been so idiotic to flaunt her guilt by acting unconcerned, but calculated enough to hide a slip up for 2 years? No, it doesnt equate. Her actions don't show a cold calculated loose murder, yet instead a young feminist innocent mother, unknowing on how to grieve. Additionally, if the kids were "getting in the way" , why not just allow Eddie to keep them? She was in a CUSTODY BA TTLE TO KEEP THEM! WHY WOULD A MOTHER WHO DIDN'T WANT HER KIDS FIGHT TO KEEP THEM? Come on! She obviously is innocent
Kat Atak
36. Katatak
Anybody remember Susan Smith, Casey Anthony, Darlie Routier (sp?)? My first introduction to the Crimmins case was the fictionalized movie. I thought then Alice was not guilty. Later I read the book-can't recall the name OR author-and still thought most likely not guilty. After watching the ID episode I firmly think she did not kill those kids. Alice not acting as most think would be appropriate really didn't and doesn't mean much. Unless you've been in a similar suituation you can't possibly say how you'd act. When my now 40 yr. old daughter, then 3, went missing I had all the police and a couple of my neighbors stunned when, as I was feeding my 10 month old son I said "Well, John, You'll be an only child now; won't that be wonderful!" I still have no idea where that came from but the police separated me from everyone and started grilling me hard. They were getting so certain I'd done something to/with Kristine. Thank goodness she was found safe and sound. I still have nightmares about her being brutilized and worse. Don't judge anyone's actions/reactions unless you've been there yourself.
37. maryann
I believe that she was guilty; had her boyfriend Tony Grace help her after she murdered the girl in what may have been a fit of anger. Then did away with the son with help of a connected person who was sent to cover up her crime. She had alot of involvements with unsavory people, however the forensics also showed that she was guilty without going into her personal escapades with men and drinking, and a pattern of abuse by leaving the children without food or money with a maid while she was partying on a boat with her boyfriend for two days. She was capable of anything, but the forensics showed the opposite of her claims as to when children were last seen, as per the autoposy and stomach contents. Also, dust on the furniture near the window showed that an intruder could not enter without disturbing the pattern of dust. The kids did not leave by the window, but thru the front door. There was alot of circumstantial evidence, but I want to know why she was let out of prison after being convicted of the little boy's murder and was supposed to be serving life.
38. maryann
I believe that she was guilty; had her boyfriend Tony Grace help her after she murdered the girl in what may have been a fit of anger. Then did away with the son with help of a connected person who was sent to cover up her crime. She had alot of involvements with unsavory people, however the forensics also showed that she was guilty without going into her personal escapades with men and drinking, and a pattern of abuse by leaving the children without food or money with a maid while she was partying on a boat with her boyfriend for two days. She was capable of anything, but the forensics showed the opposite of her claims as to when children were last seen, as per the autoposy and stomach contents. Also, dust on the furniture near the window showed that an intruder could not enter without disturbing the pattern of dust. The kids did not leave by the window, but thru the front door. There was alot of circumstantial evidence, but I want to know why she was let out of prison after being convicted of the little boy's murder and was supposed to be serving life.
michael olson
39. molson
What happened to Eddie after the trial?. Did any one ask how he grieved, did the press follow him around? where was he when his wife was in prison? why isn't the case called "The Eddie crimmins case? Couldn't they just as well,using the scant evidence, convicted him?
Brian Eberle
40. trouble1091
Well I was young, but what I remember is that Alice Crimmins was dating anthony grace and the time of the accident there's a cop Harry shields supposedly was the first cop on the case..it was funny because right after the case was over.. Harry became a very wealthy man, bought his sons businesses Tropicana route , Boars Head route , bars all in whitestone queens ..this was the neighborhood: dope the neighborhood dope was usually correct...
41. sue.g
I think its pretty clear it was mob related, and everyone was 'paid' to keep quiet. Why else would she get paroled so soon…and all the other ridiculous facts of the whole story/trial.
42. Dick Tracy
So much turmoil and drama with Alice and Ed, so sad they were able to reproduce. There was an ugly custody hearing that coming week where Ed was asking for full custody of the kids.

So why would Ed want his children dead a couple days before he was suing for custody? He wouldn't imo. Sounded like he wanted to get his kids out of what he thought was an unhealthy situation. If anything if Ed was a psychopath it would have been much more likely for Alice to have turned up dead, not his own innocent children, his own flesh and blood.

I would lean towards either the "strange pervert theory" or perhaps Alice kind of melting down , traumatized by the thought of losing her kids in a custody battle.
43. DoReDa
I think Alice was convicted because of the way she conducted herself. If anything she was guilty of neglect. Her husband on the other hand...
44. suzyQ
I was too young to remember this story when it happened. It's unfortunate the police didn't try to gather proper evidence in this case. It's such a flimsy case, it can never be solved now. However (and I'm not saying he's guilty), I find it very interesting that the male dominated investigators/jury found Alice's behavior so strange when as a woman, I find her husband's behavior equally strange- putting a microphone in the bedroom, listening from the basement? Seriously? They both obviously had issues which to me could be deemed equally peculiar. Strange people can still have their children abducted and murdered by someone else. Imagine all the modern cases that if had happened back then- all the 'strangely behaving' parents that would have been tried by public opinion and filmsy police work AND wrongly convicted on it......
45. mOLSON
Remember that the children were found with veal in their stomachs which Alice denies feeding them. Also Eddie's strange behavior and reporting being out side the window that night. Also the children were reported sometimes wandered outside.Did Eddy take them out for a meal? Did some stranger? Did Alice have the strength to strangle 2 children and carry them? Eddie might have be so angry about having to face a judge to report his wife's behavior and his wire tapping an hiing in the basement. Also the time period was one where serial killer were coming out of the closet.
46. cincyphotobug
Of course only those involved know for sure, but I find it doubtful that either parent was responsible for the death of these children. Ed was fighting for custody because he felt Alice was an unfit mother. He cared for his children’s wellbeing as is evidenced by the night he took them to his mother-in-law’s house when Alice had left them with the babysitter to go party with friends. He “rescued“ them from what he deemed a potentially harmful situation. That’s not what you would expect from a man that would callously murder them a week later just to get back at his estranged wife. That just doesn’t seem logical.
Similarly, if little Eddie and Missy were getting in the way of Alice’s social life, why would she bother to fight for custody? She would have just given them to their father, since he obviously wanted them…and that would have been that. She would have been free to live whatever lifestyle she chose to. Again, that doesn’t seem like a logical argument.
As far as their erratic behavior in dealing with the abductions and eventual murders, that’s speculative. We are all products of our own unique personal experiences and therefore handle situations differently. The manor with which humans process grief is neither predictive nor absolute. And, we have just in the last decade made significant strides in the study of PTS…understanding the effect of traumatic events on the human psyche.
It is however evident that Alice was a victim of sensationalized media attention, subpar police performance, and public vilification. Within hours it seemed she had been found guilty until proven innocent. Unfortunately for her, no one was trying to prove her innocence because public opinion of her lifestyle caused her to be viewed as anything but innocent. Narrow theological thinking of the time lumped all “moral” transgressions together. Sin was sin, when in reality promiscuity is worlds apart from murder.
Unfortunately… because of police prejudice, the most viable lead was not followed up on. There had been a recent report of a strange man trying to lure a young boy from his apartment in that very complex. You would think that such a report under the circumstance would at least garner a little attention but instead it was dismissed as unfounded. Now, in retrospect, it seems pretty founded to me. I know they say hindsight is twenty twenty...but shouldn’t foresight be at least better then blind?
47. Taylor Banaszak
It's interesting to see the comments of people, still today, who have decided she is guilty simply for being what was considered a loose woman. Quite honestly, I can't imagine how I would handle losing one child, let alone two, to such a violent act. She had, and enjoyed, an active sex life (good for her...god knows if it were the husband, everyone would have dismissed that)...I don't think that's the same as being a child killer. Such hostile judgement. But yet, I don't hear any judgements about the dad...who from what I understand was obsessed with hearing from the police, the brutal details of the states of decay of his children and such other awful details. I think that shows far more likelihood that he was guilt, as killers tend to revel in hearing the details of their crimes. Besides, its rare for a woman to kill her children...certainly rarer then men killing thier children...and considering that if she wanted to be with her lover, her mother-in-law would have gladly taken the kids...killing them seems like, well, overkill.
48. s.amper
Responses to:
John 11/17: Well reasoned. If she's a slut, she must be a murderer.
Sam Farnell 11/18: People grieve differently. And what, pray tell, is wrong with socialing with guys in pubs?
TruthBeHeard 11/23: A voice of reason. Thank you.
TaylorBanaszak 12/30: Good point about the husband. Double standards then and even now as some of the above comments make plain.
49. molson
Has anyone seen the "unsolved mysteries"about Alice Crimmons. It did have the basic facts though it was a bit dramatic. It did mention one thing I did not previously know, that a mentally ill patient stated that he killed the children. He later committed suicide. Has this ever been followed up. Even today history of this individual might shine some light on the case. the program also showed the treatment of Alice by the police One police man at the scene saying "you take the husband , I'll take the bitch". Also a reporter stated that Alice told her that the reason she did not cry in front of the cameras was that it was "her grief". Was her private grief public property?
Some very good posted comments on the case have been made here, though I think we are going around in circles. Will this case ever become a "Cold case"? Evidence may still be available?
50. Flipspiceland
Sexual addiction - don't touch certain body parts - never get fully naked - lying to callers about not being alone with another man - dozens maybe hundreds of one night stands, no such thing as too much sex.

If her obsession with that single focus on her vaginal area were even somewhat in control, it might be possible to excuse this as just an innocent pleasure seeking propensity. But anyone who has addictions that they are incapable of satisfying, is likely twisted mentally.

In that vein, the detectives that used this as their primary reason for thinking she did it, we're not that far from a motive. I believe her sexual addiction at her relatively hottest years, and the prospect of having to frustrate those out of control desires for the next 10-15 yrs propelled her to do the unthinkable coupled with her own words, "I'd rather see them Dead" than with their father.

Plainly, this is not proof that rational people would consider, so the jury likely punished her for a lifestyle that they themselves could never countenance in a mother two small children. They were wrong to do so.

The Supreme Court was right to vacate that verdict in 1975 and finally free her.

The he truth will never be known unless a confessor with absolute proof comes forward. Considering how violently the children were dealt with I don' t think that will ever happen.

I do however believe her. She would rather see them dead.
51. cheryl ann
I don't believe she killed her children..I believe she was found guilty because of her life style...Very sad...that law enforcement did a sloppy job because they did not like her....
52. Bans Johnson
It is clear that like Casey Anthony she wanted the kids out of the way so she could build a new life. What kind of make up she wore was only relevant in that people in agony over the deaths of loved ones don't tend to think of appearances or getting dates. She killed them so let's put the feminist clap trap and hand wringing to bed.
53. Richard Lutz
I object to the ninnies who think a woman can't kill. And they mask it by yelling sexism! The fact that she clearly killed her children because the rich new boyfriend didn't want them is obvious. Except to the people here who would need it proved to them the Adolf Hitler was a murderer. The reason so many guilty walk after terrible crimes. Think about what it was like to be those kids instead of crying for the killer.
Susan Amper
54. s.amper
Women kill all the time, but it's up to the courts to prove it. The courts failed to do so in the case of Alice Crimmins.
55. Jack E. Jett
Forgive me if this has been answered already and I just failed to find it.

What is the reasoning behind the children needing for forage for food late at night? I have yet to find a place that might explain. They portray her as a great loving Mom yet I have never heard of children so hungry they may slip out at night to find food from strangers.

That said, it is clear that the hyper morality of the time (and current time) would have made it impossible to ever get to the truth. I see very little difference between Crimmins and Anthony. It would be one thing if the holier than thou that DEMAND justice usually turn out to be far from holy themselves.
56. Sal
My understanding, as i recall it anyway, from a direct source is that the cops viewed the most likely scenario as Grace or Crimmins smothering the girl accidentally after a night-time wake-up. The boy saw it, and was killed as a result.
57. antcon
....in the course of justice, none should see salvation......
Susan Amper
58. s.amper
I don't really see Alice Crimmins as Portia or Shylock for that matter.
59. Breezy
I followed this case and read all the books written. I think Grace had to marry her because she knew too much.
60. Molson
In the 60's, murdered children and serial killers did not seem to make the papers. One never heard about missing or murdered children. they must have existed . It was after Charles Manson that people became more aware. If It happened today, the first thought would be that the murderer was a child molester.
Eddy Crimmings was a little wackly, hiding in the basement wiring and taping his wife. If he really cared about the children he could have easily won them in court. And if Alice wanted to give them up she could have let Eddy have them. Its more likely, and not out of the world of possibles, that an outsider took the children, feed them, and murdered them.
Look at the killer found in Calf. He murdered and molested 2 children in illinois when he was 17 and now at 70 was caught. They found the children in the woods. He also committed other crimes. He moved to another state after the murders and became a policeman.
Perhaps looking into other missing childern at that time would shed some light on the Crimmins case. On the show "Unsolved Crimes", they mentioned a mental patient confessing to the the crimmins murders shortly before he commited suicide. Has any one seen this episode ? No one else commented it.
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