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Showing posts by: Rob Hart click to see Rob Hart's profile
Mon
Jul 10 2017 4:00pm

Lester Dent for the 21st Century: How Has Pulp Fiction Changed in the Last Decade and Who Are the Players?

Read Rob Hart's exclusive guest post about the changing landscapes of pulp fiction, and then make sure to sign in and comment below for a chance to win a copy of his latest book, The Woman from Prague!

If you want to know how pulp fiction has changed in the past few decades, I think you need to start with the definition. But before I say anything else I want to establish something: I am not an expert, on anything. So let’s think of this less as an academic pursuit and more like a fun little jaw session.

Cool? Cool.

Pulp fiction used to refer to low-quality literature, churned out by folks like Lester DentDavid Goodis, and Mickey Spillane. The thought was, the stories were worth about as much as the wood pulp paper they were printed on.

[Read more about pulp fiction from Rob Hart!]

Thu
Jun 4 2015 3:30pm

From Page to Screen with Death Wish: The Case of the Disappearing Conscience

When his wife is killed and his daughter left in a vegetative state after a brutal assault, a staunch liberal seeks comfort in vigilante justice, gunning down the monsters who stalk the savage street of 1970s New York City. And in the end, he finds himself deeply conflicted over his descent into violence.

Sounds a lot like the 1974 film Death Wish directed by Michael Winner. Everything except that last part. Anyone who’s seen the movie knows there is no such moral ambiguity. It’s a celebration of violence, and Paul Kersey, played by granite-faced actor Charles Bronson, is the answer to who will save a city gone to hell.

If you want a protagonist with a conscience, you have to look to the novel by Brian Garfield. Yes, Death Wish is in the same company as Jaws and Die Hard. Movies so iconic you couldn’t be blamed for not knowing they were based on books. And, like so many book-to-film adaptations, the filmmakers kind of missed the point.

[Killing takes a toll...]