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Showing posts by: Rick Campbell click to see Rick Campbell's profile
Tue
Jul 25 2017 11:30am
Excerpt

Rick Campbell Audio Excerpt: Blackmail

Rick Campbell

Blackmail by Rick Campbell follows a bold military and political strike by the Russian government that leaves the U.S. reeling, crippled, and vulnerable, with only a desperate long-shot chance to avoid a devastating world war.

The U.S. aircraft carrier patrolling the Western Pacific Ocean is severely damaged by a surprise salvo of cruise missiles. While the Russian government officially apologizes, claiming it was the result of fire control accident during a training exercise, it was instead a calculated provocation. With the U.S. Pacific fleet already severely under strength, the Russian President decides that the US response is a clear indication of their weakness, militarily and politically, and initiates a bold plan.

Political unrest is spreading through the Eastern European states. The Russian Northern Fleet moves swiftly in the Mediterranean Sea, the Russian army is moving west to the border, and Russian Baltic and Black Sea Fleets are mobilized. In one bold strike, the Russian army moves to reoccupy a large number of the industrialized areas of the former USSR, while blockading the vital sea passages through which the world’s oil and natural gas transit. To make matters worse, Russia’s Special Forces have wired every major oil and natural gas pipeline with explosives. If the U.S. makes one move to thwart Russia, they’ll destroy them all. The U.S. is risking disaster if it acts, but the alternative is quite possibly worse. Torn between the unthinkable and the impossible, the only possible move—to launch an attack on all fronts, simultaneously.

[Read an excerpt from Blackmail...]

Fri
Jun 23 2017 9:00am
Excerpt

Rick Campbell Excerpt: Blackmail

Rick Campbell

Blackmail by Rick CampbellBlackmail by Rick Campbell follows a bold military and political strike by the Russian government that leaves the U.S. reeling, crippled, and vulnerable, with only a desperate long-shot chance to avoid a devastating world war (available June 27, 2017).

The U.S. aircraft carrier patrolling the Western Pacific Ocean is severely damaged by a surprise salvo of cruise missiles. While the Russian government officially apologizes, claiming it was the result of fire control accident during a training exercise, it was instead a calculated provocation. With the U.S. Pacific fleet already severely under strength, the Russian President decides that the US response is a clear indication of their weakness, militarily and politically, and initiates a bold plan.

Political unrest is spreading through the Eastern European states. The Russian Northern Fleet moves swiftly in the Mediterranean Sea, the Russian army is moving west to the border, and Russian Baltic and Black Sea Fleets are mobilized. In one bold strike, the Russian army moves to reoccupy a large number of the industrialized areas of the former USSR, while blockading the vital sea passages through which the world’s oil and natural gas transit. To make matters worse, Russia’s Special Forces have wired every major oil and natural gas pipeline with explosives. If the U.S. makes one move to thwart Russia, they’ll destroy them all. The U.S. is risking disaster if it acts, but the alternative is quite possibly worse. Torn between the unthinkable and the impossible, the only possible move—to launch an attack on all fronts, simultaneously.

[Read an excerpt from Blackmail...]

Wed
Jun 29 2016 3:00pm

Q&A with Rick Campbell, Author of Ice Station Nautilus

Rick Campbell, author of Ice Station Nautilus, spent more than 20 years on multiple submarine tours. Now, he writes submarine-based military thrillers.

Rick was kind enough to take some time from his busy schedule to answer some of CrimeHQ's questions about submarines, how they navigate, and how his experiences influence his novels.

[Read the full Q&A here...]

Thu
Mar 24 2016 11:30am

Submarine Collisions in Fiction—Do They Occur in Reality?

Read this exclusive guest post by Rick Campbell, author of Ice Station Nautilus, and then make sure you're signed in and comment for a chance to win an advanced copy of this upcoming submarine and military thriller!

The short answer—yes. I’ll have to credit Wikipedia with a list of the more well-know submarine collisions since 2000:

2001 - USS Greeneville collision with Ehime Maru
2002 - USS Oklahoma City collision with Norwegian tanker Norman Lady
2005 - USS Philadelphia collision with MV Yasa Aysen
2007 - USS Newport News collision with Japanese tanker Mogamigawa
2009 - HMS Vanguard and Triomphant collision
2009 - USS Hartford collision with USS New Orleans
2012 - USS Montpelier collision with USS San Jacinto
2013 - USS Jacksonville collision with “unknown” vessel

This is an interesting topic for both writers and readers, because a cornerstone of most military thrillers is that the plot be plausible. But therein lies the problem—submarine collisions are highly improbable.

[Read more about submarine collisions here...]

Thu
Feb 19 2015 1:00pm

Diving into Submarine Movies: How Realistic are They?

The helm of the Ohio-class guided-missile submarine, USS Florida (SSGN-728), in March 2010.

A lot of people are fascinated with submarines, perhaps because of their stealthy missions, long periods underwater, or because few people have been aboard one. The public’s concept of submarine life is influenced by what they read and see, particularly movies, which begs the question – How realistic are they?

I’ll start with Hollywood movies in general. What most people envision when they think of submarines are the small, grimy diesel boats featured in dozens of older movies. Today, the United States only uses nuclear powered submarines – clean behemoths compared to their diesel boat counterparts. For example, Ohio class submarines, which carry Trident ballistic missiles, are almost two football fields long, seven stories tall from the keel to the top of the sail, and wide as a three-lane highway. Despite the size, however, there still isn’t much room inside, as submarines are packed with the equipment necessary to operate and engage in combat.

When it comes to Hollywood movies that feature modern nuclear submarines, the most popular movies are The Hunt for Red October and Crimson Tide, so I’ll focus on those two.

[Let's dive in...]

Mon
Mar 10 2014 3:00pm
Excerpt

The Trident Deception: New Excerpt

Rick Campbell

The Trident Deception is the debut thriller from Rick Campbell about a nuclear submarine that unknowingly receives orders to prepare for missile launch from a rogue organization (available March 11, 2014).

The USS Kentucky—a Trident ballistic missile submarine carrying a full complement of 192 nuclear warheads—is about to go on a routine patrol. Not long after it reaches the open sea, however, the Kentucky receives a launch order. After receiving that launch order, it is cut off from all counter-orders and disappears into the Pacific while it makes the eight-day transit to the launch site. What the Kentucky’s crew doesn’t know is that those launch orders haven’t actually come from the U.S. government.

Rogue elements within the Mossad have learned that Iran has developed its first nuclear weapon and, in ten days, will detonate it—and the target is Israel. The suspected weapon complex is too far underground for conventional weapons to harm it, and the only choice is a pre-emptive nuclear strike. With limited time, this rogue group initiates a long-planned operation called the Trident Deception. They’ll transmit false orders and use a U.S. nuclear submarine to launch the attack.

In this thriller from Rick Campbell, with only 8 days before the Kentucky is in launch range and with the submarine cut off from any outside communication, one senior officer, the father of one of the officers aboard the submarine, must assemble and lead a team of attack submarines to find, intercept and neutralize the Kentucky before it can unknowingly unleash a devastating nuclear attack.

Chapter 1

JERUSALEM, ISRAEL

Under normal circumstances, the thirteen men and women seated in the conference room would have been dressed in formal attire, the men wearing crisp business suits, the women turned out in silk blouses and coordinating skirts. They would have struck up lively conversations, attempting to persuade their colleagues to accept one proposal or another, their animated faces reflecting off the room’s varnished chestnut paneling. But tonight, pulled away from their evening activities, they wore sports slacks and shirts, their hair wet and windblown, their faces grim as they sat quietly in their seats, eyes fixed on the man at the head of the U-shaped conference table.

[Read the full excerpt of The Trident Deception by Rick Campbell...]