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Showing posts by: Renee Patrick click to see Renee Patrick's profile
Fri
Apr 7 2017 9:00am
Excerpt

Dangerous to Know: New Excerpt

Renee Patrick

Dangerous to Know by Renee PatrickDangerous to Know by Renee Patrick is the 2nd book in the Lillian Frost & Edith Head series, beguilingly blending forgotten fact and fanciful fiction while keeping Hollywood glamour front and center (available April 11, 2017).

Los Angeles, 1938. Former aspiring actress Lillian Frost is adjusting to a new life of boldfaced names as social secretary to a movie-mad millionaire. Costume designer Edith Head is running Paramount Pictures’ wardrobe department, but only until a suitable replacement comes along. The two friends again become partners thanks to an international scandal, a real-life incident in which the war clouds gathering over Europe cast a shadow on Hollywood.

Lillian attended the Manhattan dinner party at which well-heeled guests insulted Adolf Hitler within earshot of a maid with Nazi sympathies. Now, secrets the maid vengefully spilled have all New York society running for cover—and two Paramount stars, Jack Benny and George Burns, facing smuggling charges.

Edith also seeks Lillian’s help on a related matter. The émigré pianist in Marlene Dietrich’s budding nightclub act has vanished. Lillian reluctantly agrees to look for him. When Lillian finds him dead, Dietrich blames agents of the Reich. As Lillian and Edith unravel intrigue extending from Paramount’s Bronson Gate to FDR’s Oval Office, only one thing is certain: they’ll do it in style.

[Read an excerpt from Dangerous to Know...]

Thu
Jun 16 2016 1:00pm

Two-Part Q&A between Adam Christopher and Renee Patrick

Read this exclusive two-part Q&A between Adam Christopher, author of Made to Kill, and Renee Patrick, the married writing team of Rosemarie and Vince Keenan who authored Design for Dying, and then make sure you're signed in and comment for a chance to win a copy of both of their latest books!

[Check out the full Q&A, and don't forget to comment!]

Sun
Apr 17 2016 10:00am
Excerpt

Design for Dying: New Excerpt

Renee Patrick

Design for Dying by Renee Patrick is the 1st in the new Lillian Frost & Edith Head series (Available April 19, 2016).

Los Angeles, 1937. Lillian Frost has traded dreams of stardom for security as a department store salesgirl . . . until she discovers she's a suspect in the murder of her former roommate, Ruby Carroll. Party girl Ruby died wearing a gown she stole from the wardrobe department at Paramount Pictures, domain of Edith Head.

Edith has yet to win the first of her eight Academy Awards; right now she's barely hanging on to her job, and a scandal is the last thing she needs. To clear Lillian's name and save Edith's career, the two women join forces.

Unraveling the mystery pits them against a Hungarian princess on the lam, a hotshot director on the make, and a private investigator who's not on the level. All they have going for them are dogged determination, assists from the likes of Bob Hope and Barbara Stanwyck, and a killer sense of style. In show business, that just might be enough.

[Read an excerpt from Design for Dying here...]