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Showing posts by: Nicolás Obregón click to see Nicolás Obregón's profile
Mon
Apr 17 2017 10:00am
Excerpt

Blue Light Yokohama: Audio Excerpt

Nicolás Obregón

Blue Light Yokohama by Nicolás Obregón follows newly reinstated homicide detective Iwata as the violent murder of an entire family embroils him in a case that soon reveals itself to be only one crime in a string of ritualistic killings.

Newly reinstated to the Homicide Division and transferred to a precinct in Tokyo, Inspector Iwata is facing superiors who don’t want him there and is assigned a recalcitrant partner, Noriko Sakai, who’d rather work with anyone else. After the previous detective working the case killed himself, Iwata and Sakai are assigned to investigate the slaughter of an entire family, a brutal murder with no clear motive or killer. At the crime scene, they find puzzling ritualistic details. Black smudges. A strange incense smell. And a symbol—a large black sun. Iwata doesn’t know what the symbol means but he knows what the killer means by it: I am here. I am not finished.

As Iwata investigates, it becomes clear that these murders by the Black Sun Killer are not the first, nor the last attached to that symbol. As he tries to track down the history of black sun symbol, puzzle out the motive for the crime, and connect this to other murders, Iwata finds himself racing another clock—the superiors who are trying to have him removed for good.

[Listen to an audio excerpt from Blue Light Yokohama...]

Thu
Mar 9 2017 4:45pm

The Birth of Blue Light Yokohama: A Family Murder Becomes Fiction (Part 3)

Read Part 3 of Nicolás Obregón's 3-part series, “The Birth of Blue Light Yokohama,” and make sure to sign in and comment below for a chance to win a copy of his exciting debut!


Part 1 | Part 2


Some six years ago, I boarded a flight from London Heathrow bound for Japan. As I sat there, I could barely contain my excitement. I was in my mid-20s, working for a travel magazine, and was being sent on assignment to Japan—my dream destination.

By 2014, things were different. I was no longer in my mid-20s. I was no longer working as a travel writer. It was less of a struggle to contain my excitement about things. After a decade of travelling the world and living in various flat-shares around London, I was in a soul-destroying job and back living at my mother’s. The job (writing for a legal publisher) was only meant to be temporary, something to keep my head above water while I figured out what I wanted to do. But four years later, I was still there, by then a deputy editor.

The conditions were awful, almost laughably so, but the pay was decent enough, and I did—in a very distant way—get to work with letters for a living. As someone who had always dreamed of being a writer, there was a miniscule pleasure in editing the dreary copy of badly-remunerated twenty-somethings who would leave the company within six months. Or at least that’s what I told myself.

[Read Part 3 of The Birth of Blue Light Yokohama!]

Thu
Mar 2 2017 3:00pm

The Birth of Blue Light Yokohama: The Miyazawa Family Murders (Part 2)

Read Part 1 of this thrilling 3-part series first over at Thought Matters!

The Miyazawa family’s house was a fair size, especially by Japanese standards. It stood in a municipal park in Setagaya, a largely residential ward clinging to the western limits of Tokyo. Soshigaya Park has quaint walking trails, sports pitches, a playground for children, and, on its fringes, a picturesque little canal with crooked old trees hanging over its banks. In 1990, there were 200 houses in this park. A decade later, following park expansion, there were four.
Today, there is only one.

In the summer, its lawns are not mown. In the fall, leaves are not swept away. At night, its lights do not come on. And if you walked past it today, you’d be likely to miss it. You’re looking for a side path blocked off with little cones. The house itself is boarded up now, fenced off, with three stories of tarpaulin shielding it from public view. A policeman stands guard outside, hands on his hips, because this is no longer a house. It is a shell, a mausoleum.

[A museum of murder...]

Wed
Mar 1 2017 10:05am
Excerpt

Blue Light Yokohama: New Excerpt

Nicolás Obregón

Blue Light Yokohama by Nicolas ObregonBlue Light Yokohama by Nicolás Obregón is a compelling, brilliantly moody, and layered novel that's sure to be one of the most talked about debuts in 2017 (available March 7, 2017).

Newly reinstated to the Homicide Division and transferred to a precinct in Tokyo, Inspector Iwata is facing superiors who don’t want him there and is assigned a recalcitrant partner, Noriko Sakai, who’d rather work with anyone else. After the previous detective working the case killed himself, Iwata and Sakai are assigned to investigate the slaughter of an entire family, a brutal murder with no clear motive or killer. At the crime scene, they find puzzling ritualistic details. Black smudges. A strange incense smell. And a symbol—a large black sun. Iwata doesn’t know what the symbol means but he knows what the killer means by it: I am here. I am not finished.

As Iwata investigates, it becomes clear that these murders by the Black Sun Killer are not the first, nor the last attached to that symbol. As he tries to track down the history of black sun symbol, puzzle out the motive for the crime, and connect this to other murders, Iwata finds himself racing another clock—the superiors who are trying to have him removed for good.

[Read an excerpt from Blue Light Yokohama...]