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Showing posts by: Gabino Iglesias click to see Gabino Iglesias's profile
Fri
Aug 25 2017 12:00pm

Review: A Thousand Cuts by Thomas Mogford

A Thousand Cuts by Thomas Mogford is the fourth Spike Sanguinetti novel, where a fatal explosion in the past and a series of brutal murders in the present question whether justice is being served for betrayals long hidden.

A Thousand Cuts, the fourth entry in Thomas Mogford’s Spike Sanguinetti series, offers readers a nuanced, multilayered narrative that shifts constantly while somehow retaining an overall balance between its elements. Coming in at a little over 350 pages, A Thousand Cuts is a satisfying read that offers something for fans of legal thrillers, history buffs, straight crime lovers, and mysteries. 

Back in 1940, a bomb went off in Gibraltar, killing two British soldiers who were patrolling the dockyards that night. After a short investigation, a Spaniard was executed for the crime. Although the man spent time with the wrong crowd, he claimed to be innocent until his execution.

[Read Gabino Iglesias's review of A Thousand Cuts...]

Fri
Aug 18 2017 1:00pm

Review: Darkansas by Jarret Middleton

Darkansas by Jarret Middleton is a dark, compelling novel of country noir about a family with a secret past and a curse several generations old.

Rural or country noir can be one of the most heartfelt and entertaining crime subgenres when done by capable authors such as Daniel Woodrell and David Joy. Now, Jarret Middleton’s extraordinary new novel, Darkansas, has placed its author in that distinguished group. Dark, bizarre, and steeped in the culture of the Ozarks, Darkansas is a hybrid narrative that inhabits the interstitial space between crime, horror, literary fiction, and mystery. 

Jordan Bayne is an ex-con eking out a life working as a musician and living in a small, filthy room in San Antonio, Texas. He is a haunted man who’s constantly in trouble and always on the run, sometimes from things he can’t put his finger on. He’s also condemned to live in the shadow of his brother, Malcolm, who works in the insurance business and has never been in trouble, and his father, Walker, a man who’s a legend in the music business. When Malcolm comes back home to the Ozarks to get married, the two brothers and their father are thrown into a maelstrom of repressed emotions and dark family history that threatens to not only derail the festivities but also end in death.

[Read Gabino Iglesias's review of Darkansas...]

Sun
Aug 13 2017 12:00pm

Review: Cold Snap by Allison Brennan

Cold Snap by Allison Brennan is the seventh Lucy Kincaid novel, where the Kincaid Family Christmas Reunion is threatened by murder.

I’m usually wary of novels that kick things off with forewords that explain a bit of what’s to follow and who’s involved. In the case of Allison Brennan’s Cold Snap, the foreword even gave an update on the lives of a dozen characters in the author’s Lucy Kincaid series. A few chapters later, I was glad for said foreword.

Brennan’s Kincaid series is a long, deep slice of police procedural fiction, and while those not familiar with the series can enjoy random novels from it, it’s better to approach the texts with some inkling of what’s happening and who the key players in the narrative are. While previous knowledge of the main character’s history, adventures, and motivations certainly enriches the reading experience, the series does not demand reading previous book in order to enjoy any of its novels. 

[Read Gabino Iglesias's review of Cold Snap...]