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Showing posts by: Barry Lancet click to see Barry Lancet's profile
Wed
Jun 21 2017 12:00pm

Q&A with Barry Lancet, Author of The Spy Across the Table

Read this exclusive Q&A with author Barry Lancet, and then make sure you're signed in and comment for a chance to win a copy of his latest Jim Brodie thriller!

I first met Barry Lancet in 2012 through the International Thriller Writers organization’s Debut Authors Program. It was an unlikely friendship, if only because Barry lives in Tokyo and I’m in Washington, D.C. But I liked his dry sense of humor and his Larry David-esque worldview. And then I read an advanced copy of his debut novel, Japantown, and was blown away by his talent. I wasn’t surprised that it later won numerous awards and citations and that the Jim Brodie series was optioned for television by J. J. Abrams. 

Learn how you can win a signed copy of Anthony Franze's latest legal thriller, The Outsider, from Goodreads!

Now, five years and collectively seven books between us, we’ve shared many laughs and misadventures. And even though he’s a notorious welcher on bets (he owes me hundreds of beers), and despite once making me brave D.C. traffic to drive him to the airport—not to catch a plane but for research for his book—he’s one of my closest friends. So it was with great pleasure that when I read his latest Brodie book, The Spy Across the Table, I loved it. Like Barry, Jim Brodie has gotten better with each book, and this one amps up the tension and political intrigue. 

When Criminal Element asked me to interview Barry, they had no idea we were close friends. And I suspect they didn’t know that would make for an unconventional Q&A:  

[Read the full Q&A below!]

Mon
Feb 20 2017 12:00pm

Happy President’s Day to the Most Famous Lawyer/Thriller-Writer In History (It’s Not Who You Think)

Who’s the most famous lawyer-author of all time? Nope, not John Grisham.

Here are some hints:

  • Last week was his birthday.
  • He grew up in a log cabin.
  • He wore a tall top hat.
  • And, oh yeah, he helped free the slaves.

[Learn more about the presidential crime story...]

Wed
Jan 6 2016 1:00pm

Thrillers, Mysteries, and Crime Fiction: 5 Masters of Opening Lines

After you’ve read Barry Lancet and Anthony Franze’s piece about some of the masters of opening lines, comment below with your own favorite opening from a thriller, mystery, or crime fiction novel and you’ll be entered for a chance to win a copy of Barry’s new novel, PACIFIC BURN, from his acclaimed Jim Brodie series, and Anthony’s upcoming heart-stopper, THE ADVOCATE’S DAUGHTER.

“It was a dark and stormy night.”

Ah, the power of the opening line. The writer’s obsession. To capture the story and the voice that will lure the reader in. That first kiss that (hopefully) leads to the seduction. We all know famous openings from the classics—“Call me Ishmael,” “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times,” and the list goes on—but what about the great first lines from popular fiction?

As two thriller writers who live with the obsession ourselves, we compared notes on other thriller, mystery, and crime fiction writers we consider masters of the art of the opening. We had a number of the same names on our respective lists. Here are five: 

[See if your favorites made their list...]