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Showing posts by: Alyssa Mercante click to see Alyssa Mercante's profile
Dec 16 2015 3:00pm

Jessica Jones: “AKA Noir Feminist Fodder”

Marvel’s Jessica Jones isn’t a perfect television show—there’s an aggravating lack of women of color in the cast and Krysten Ritter’s dry delivery often traps her in a “Super-Cynical Riot Grrrrl” trope—but it’s a crucial addition to the genre. JJ is a gritty, noir subversion of the traditional hetero/macho superhero. It presents an unflinching dramatization of domestic abuse, a contemporary performance of female sexuality, and a super-strength punch to the testicles of problematic modes of masculinity. Flaws and all, it’s damn brilliant.

Let’s unpack the dense, tattered leather suitcase that is the cultural significance of Jessica Jones (please be aware that spoilers will follow and if you don’t like it you better step up your binge game).

[You’ve been warned…]