A suspenseful story of envy and obsession that will make you doubt that seeing is ever believing.

Brian Klingborg, author of the new Inspector Lu Fei mystery, Thief of Souls, stops by this week to provide us with his list of recent noir films from Asia.

Introducing Case Closed: Your Next True Crime Podcast Binge

Book Review: All These Bodies by Kendare Blake

All These Bodies by Kendare Blake is an edge-of-your-seat YA mystery involving 16 bloodless bodies, two teenagers, and one impossible explanation that proves the truth is as hard to believe as it is to find. In the summer of 1958, a gruesome string of murders reshaped ordinary life in the Midwest. Corpses were found entirely…

Top Five Fictional Serial Killers

It’s fair to say we’ve both read or watched the best thrillers during the last thirty years. In our opinion, obviously! And there’s one thing we always agree on: what scares us the most is serial killer with clear motives and a detailed plan. A relentless murderer who won’t stop until they’ve realized their grand…

Midwestern Murders in the 1950s: Five Films Inspired by Starkweather/Fugate & Hickock/Smith

In December 1957 and January 1958, nineteen-year-old Charlie Starkweather embarked on a killing spree through Nebraska and Wyoming. Most of the murders took place in just over a week, an eight-day rampage of shootings and stabbings that confounded authorities and terrorized the general public. With his even younger girlfriend in tow, Charlie killed eleven people,…

Book Review: A Most Clever Girl by Stephanie Marie Thornton

A Most Clever Girl is based on the life of the American communist spy Elizabeth Bentley. She was recruited in New York City at the beginning of World War II to fight against fascism. Elizabeth was a well-educated loner working in dead-end jobs. On a personal level, becoming a communist meant she suddenly had a…

Crime at its Core: Looking Back at Pietro Di Donato’s Christ in Concrete (1939)

Author Peter Blauner discusses Christ in Concrete, an often-overlooked novel about the life of Italian immigrants on the Lower East Side of Manhattan in the 1920s and a twelve-year-old boy who must support his family after his father’s untimely death. Most crime novels try to hook you on the first page, or even the first…

Book Review: The Mad Women’s Ball by Victoria Mas

The Mad Women’s Ball by Victoria Mas is a critically acclaimed French novel of historical fiction, translated by Frank Wynne, that follows the mistreatment and dehumanization of women deemed “mad” and forced into imprisonment within a women’s asylum.  The Belle Epoque was a riot of culture and prosperity for the French Republic, with innovations in…

Cooking the Books: Halloween Party Murder by Leslie Meier, Lee Hollis and Barbara Ross

I usually find mystery novellas to be fairly hit or miss, but I have very much enjoyed the holiday-themed collections Kensington puts out showcasing some of their finest cozy authors. This latest collection is frankly one of their best yet! Revolving around a murder at a Halloween party, each story here has the meat of…

Book Review: The Missing Hours by Julia Dahl

The Missing Hours by Julia Dahl is a novel about obsession, privilege, and the explosive consequences of one violent act, where a violent sexual assault leads Claudia Castro down the painful road toward vengeance but also recovery. When Claudia Castro wakes up in her dorm room, she realizes quickly that something is very, very wrong.…

Q&A with Tori Eldridge, Author of The Ninja Betrayed

Tori Eldridge is the author of The Ninja Daughter, The Ninja’s Blade, and The Ninja Betrayed (a 9/14/2021 release from Polis Books, $16.95). Tori’s been nominated for the Anthony, Lefty, and Macavity awards. She was also a film and stage performer. Tori was kind enough to speak with me about her work.   Q: Hello…

Book Review: Chasing the Boogeyman by Richard Chizmar

Like any kind of writing, literary criticism must strive to find the most precise words to communicate what it wants readers to see as it deconstructs a narrative. That’s why vague words like “special” and “unique” are frowned upon; they fail to be specific. That said, both of them apply perfectly to Richard Chizmar’s Chasing…