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Raymond Chandler
Showing all CriminalElement.com content using the tag "Raymond Chandler" including series, stories, blog posts, and users. To browse published posts on the front page, click here.
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MaxAllanCollins
May 25 2016

Nate Heller & Mike Hammer

Read this exclusive guest post from Max Allan Collins, author of Better Dead, comparing his own Nate Heller series to finishing Mickey Spillane's posthumous Mike Hammer manuscripts, and...
DavidCranmer
May 3 2016

Prolonged Parker: Slow Burn by Ace Atkins

Robert B. Parker's Slow Burn by Ace Atkins is the newest Spenser novel, where Boston PI Spenser faces a hot case and a personal crisis (Available today!). An assessment of a new Spenser novel...
CrimeHQ
April 14 2016

Q&A with Lily Gardner, Author of Betting Blind

Lily Gardner, author of Betting Blind—the 2nd Lennox Cooper Mystery—was kind enough to answer some of Criminal Element's questions about her beginnings as a writer, her inspirations,...
DavidCranmer
January 7 2016

Hardboiled, Surreal, and Bewitching: 3 Haruki Murakami Short Stories

International novelist Haruki Murakami’s first novel, Hear the Wind Sing(1979) was an immediate success, and since then, he has developed a fanatic worldwide following that eagerly anticipates...
CrimeHQ
December 8 2015

The ZINNG: How Profound

Pennycook’s Poppycock – A new scientific study has been released in Judgment and Decision Making that is garnering headlines (most of them overblown, sensationalist, and reactionary)...
CrimeHQ
November 18 2015

The ZINNG: 10 Commandments for Crime Fiction

Stolen from Mount Sinai – Crime fiction has seen its fair share of variety in style and content throughout its long history, but just like any specific genre, a general archetype is often...
LyndsayFaye
October 30 2015

A Study in Sherlock: Talking Holmes with Otto Penzler and Lyndsay Faye

When I moved to New York City, there were three mystery-centric bookshops still in operation—now that (tragically) only one remains, you have to assume Otto Penzler of The Mysterious Bookshop...
DavidCranmer
October 20 2015

Why Crime Readers Should Be Reading Martin Amis: London Fields and Night Train

Martin Amis hails from distinguished literary stock, his father being Kingsley Amis (Lucky Jim), and his stepmother Elizabeth Jane Howard (The Cazalet Chronicle). A writer himself since the 1970s,...
AngieBarry
October 14 2015

Champagne Sleuthing with Nick and Nora: A Look at the Thin Man Films

Ah, to be a mystery fan in the 1930s... Pulp fiction was rife with the jaded private eye. Magazines like Black Mask brimmed with femme fatales. Cigarette smoke filled rooms dimly lit and latticed...
ScottAdlerberg
October 5 2015

Investigate Thyself: Missing Person by France’s Patrick Modiano

Patrick Modiano’s Missing Person focuses on a private detective, introduced as Guy Roland, who investigates himself. The location is Paris; the time period, the mid-1960s. I say...
CrimeHQ
September 11 2015

The ZINNG: Veteran Noir, Cozy Sleuth Tips, and Sith Lord Meltzer

With references to veterans in Raymond Chandler, David Goodis, and James Crumley, among others, Paul D. Marks is over at SleuthSayers discussing his inspirations within a specific subgenre: returning...
adgarrett
July 30 2015

A Brit’s 400-mile Road Trip Hunting American Crime

Road trip – had to be a winner, right? As a kid growing up in the narrow streets of northern England, I knew America as surely as I knew the grey concrete of my own back yard. For years,...
RKLewis
July 7 2015

Fresh Meat: Fast Shuffle by David Black

Fast Shuffle by David Black is a hard-boiled noir about a used-car salesman who believes he's a private detective straight from the pages of Raymond Chandler (available July 7, 2015). Fast Shuffle...
DavidCranmer
June 17 2015

Fresh Meat: Vixen by Bill Pronzini

Vixen by Bill Pronzini is the newest addition to the Nameless Detective series where a femme fatale spells more than trouble for the semi-retired P.I. (available June 23, 2015). The Nameless Detective...
ScottAdlerberg
May 11 2015

Familiar Yet Foreign Noir: The Late Show

The opening of Robert Benton’s private eye film The Late Show is chock-full of deception. We first see the Warner Brothers logo, but it’s not the Warner logo of 1977, the year the film was...
ScottAdlerberg
March 13 2015

The Mongolian Conspiracy by Rafael Bernal

It’s 1968, the height of the Cold War, and we are in Mexico City. Filiberto Garcia is a sixty year old Mexican policeman. Over the course of his life he has killed people: men, women, a priest....
DavidCranmer
December 20 2014

Back to the Beginning: The Bounty Hunters by Elmore Leonard

From the early 1970s until 1992’s Unforgiven, Westerns had become outmoded, pitiful television productions and lame B-films that had run the genre into the dust heap, and unless Clint Eastwood...
CharlesFinch
October 16 2014

The Historical Villain: A Whodunnit in One Dimension

The golden age of the fictional villain—twirling his moustache, laughing Frenchly, tying women to train tracks—was the 19th century. In that innocent age, you could actually spook readers...
DavidCranmer
October 8 2014

Hardboiled Hemingway (With Noir Chasers)

Ernest Hemingway is one of the biggest names of 20th century literature. He won the Pulitzer and Nobel Prize in Literature in 1954, and his star seems in no danger of burning out even with tastes...
JakeHinkson
September 25 2014

Bacall By Herself

In our series on Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall, we looked at the films the great screen duo made between 1944 and 1948. After 1948, however, the two never made another movie together. (Though...
BrianGreene
September 18 2014

Get Carter by Ted Lewis: Crime Fiction’s Open Source Blueprint

I’ll get right to the point here; Ted Lewis’s 1970 novel Jack’s Return Home (re-titled Get Carter so I’ll call it that from here on) is one of the most influential works of crime...
JakeHinkson
September 17 2014

The Noir Geek’s Guide to The Big Lebowski

The Coen Brother’s 1998 comedy The Big Lebowski has many cultural touchstones—the sixties, hippies, Vietnam, CCR, weed, Busby Berkley musicals—but the underlying structure of...
JakeHinkson
September 10 2014

Bogie and Bacall: The Big Sleep (1946)

In tribute to the late Lauren Bacall, we’re looking at the four classic films she made with husband and screen partner Humphrey Bogart between 1944 and 1948: To Have and Have Not, The Big...
DavidCranmer
September 7 2014

Ray Bradbury Writes Noir: Death Is a Lonely Business

I suspect most people think of science fiction and fantasy when they hear the name Ray Bradbury, who—along with Isaac Asimov, Phillip K. Dick, Robert A. Heinlein, and Arthur C. Clarke—represented...
JakeHinkson
August 3 2014

The Movies of 1944: Murder, My Sweet

To celebrate the 70th anniversary of film noir’s landmark year, we’re looking at the six key noirs of 1944: Double Indemnity, Laura, Murder My Sweet, Phantom Lady, When Strangers Marry,...
JakeHinkson
July 23 2014

The Movies of 1944: Double Indemnity

This year film noir turns 70. While there had been some intermittent films leading up to the birth of the classic noir, in 1944 the dahlia bloomed with six key films: Double Indemnity, Laura, Murder...
LyndsayFaye
June 10 2014

Slate Nailed It: YA and Detective Fiction Are for Rubes

An article in Slate by Ruth Graham that appeared last week decrying the popularity of YA fiction among adult readers has created quite the backlash from other media forums (including to name a few,...
JakeHinkson
May 16 2014

Adventures In Screenwriting: The Amazing Leigh Brackett

Pop quiz: What do The Big Sleep, Rio Bravo, El Dorado, The Long Goodbye, and The Empire Strikes Back have in common? Answer: They were all written or co-written by the same woman, the amazing...
JakeHinkson
May 11 2014

Pulp Nonfiction: A Guide to Studying Hardboiled Crime

You know you’re officially a mystery fanatic when you start reading books about books. Luckily, over the years many studies of hardboiled and noir crime fiction have been published to meet...
JakeHinkson
March 24 2014

Twin Peaks Rewatch: Episode 7: Realization Time

Let us now praise Audrey Horne. When we were first introduced to the pretty high school senior played by Sherilyn Fenn, she seemed to be perfectly in sync with the weirdness of her town: disengaged,...