<i>Brush Back</i>: New Excerpt Brush Back: New Excerpt Sara Paretsky Hateful criminal, monstrous act, political backlash. Of course, V.I. ends up on the case! FM: <i>Lord of the Wings</i> by Donna Andrews FM: Lord of the Wings by Donna Andrews Katrina Niidas Holm It's Halloween, and everyone seems to have a skeleton in their closet. <i>The Madagaskar Plan</i>: New Excerpt The Madagaskar Plan: New Excerpt Guy Saville The Nazi's control Africa, and their plan is almost complete... <i>The Fall</i>: New Excerpt The Fall: New Excerpt R.J. Pineiro A lot can change in five years, or in Jack's case, one day.
From The Blog
July 29, 2015
Man Fakes 911 Call to Get Air Conditioner Fixed
Teddy Pierson
July 28, 2015
Royally Flushed: Atlantic City's Counterfeit Chip Scam
Crime HQ
July 24, 2015
Washburn, Mims, and Foley: Women Authors Leading the Western Charge
Edward A. Grainger
July 22, 2015
Announcing the Hammett Prize Nominees
Crime HQ
July 21, 2015
Naked Drunk Driving Suspect Arrested After Falling Off Barn Roof
Teddy Pierson
Showing posts by: Niall Alexander click to see Niall Alexander's profile
Sun
Jan 8 2012 5:51pm

Neil Gaiman and the Great Detective: A Case of Death and Honey

Like Holmes, Neil Gaiman also keeps bees.  Here, he’s dressed for the hive with his faithful hound in the background.The last time international treasure Neil Gaiman tangled with the classic canon coined by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, he came away with a Hugo Award in 2004 for writing the year’s Best Short Story, and something of cherry on top, too: namely the 2005 Locus Award for Best Novelette.

If he hadn’t had it already, he could have had my heart as well.

Indubitably, the widespread recognition given “A Study In Emerald” was both hard-earned and well-deserved. It was a slow burn of a story, certainly, but when it caught its light was surely bright; brilliant, I’d go so far as to say. “A Study In Emerald” was a thing of poise and power — harmonious in one moment with the Sherlock Holmes and the Dr Watson we knew from the tales of discovery and derring-do and delightful, decisive deduction we loved, and in the next... not.

Of course “A Study In Emerald” was no mere Sherlock Holmes story. Unexpectedly, it set the great detective and his beloved biographer against the oeuvre of another turn-of-the-century novelist: one of Conan Doyle’s most celebrated contemporaries, namely the dark fantasist H. P. Lovecraft.

Image via Neil Gaiman’s online journal.

To read the full article on Neil Gaiman’s Sherlock pastiche “The Case of Death and Honey” with a link to download the broadsheet version of “A Study in Emerald”, visit our sister science fiction and fantasy blog, Tor.com.