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Showing posts by: Hannah Dennison click to see Hannah Dennison's profile
Mon
May 2 2016 1:30pm

What Became of Downton Abbey?

When Downton Abbey finally ended after six glorious seasons, I don’t think I was alone in feeling an acute sense of loss. Even my husband was maudlin for about three days after the finale.

On the whole, it was a satisfying ending, where all the storylines—both upstairs and down—were tied up neatly. Even poor Lady Edith found happiness, at last, with her Bertie.

But what became of Downton Abbey? What became of the house itself?

[If these walls could talk...]

Tue
Apr 26 2016 11:00am

A Killer Ball at Honeychurch Hall: New Excerpt

A Killer Ball at Honeychurch Hall by Hannah Dennison is the 3rd installment of the Honeychurch Hall Mystery series (Available May 3, 2016).

When antique dealer Kat Stanford stumbles upon the partially mummified body of a young woman in an abandoned wing at Honeychurch Hall, suspicion falls on those who had been living there many years ago. And it appears that the deceased had been murdered. Given her mother Iris’s checkered past, Kat is not surprised to learn that Iris knew the victim.

Meanwhile, the unexpected appearance of former lothario Bryan Laney sets female hearts aflutter. Despite the passing years, time has not dampened his ardor for Iris, but the feeling is not reciprocated.

With stories of hidden treasure and secret chambers, past and present collide. As Kat becomes embroiled once more in her mother’s mysterious and tumultuous bygone days, she comes to realize that life is never black and white, and sometimes it is necessary to risk your own life to protect the lives of the ones you love.

[Read an excerpt from A Killer Ball at Honeychurch Hall here...]

Thu
May 7 2015 4:00pm

It’s Always a Mother’s Day with Agatha Christie

Agatha Christie's mother , Clarissa Miller, in Torquay before WWI, and Agatha Christie, nee Miller (1890-1976) as a child, date unknown.When it comes to the Queen of Crime, my mother is a walking encyclopedia of knowledge. Thanks to her, I’ve become increasingly familiar with the more personal side of Agatha Christie’s life as it relates to her family relationships—especially with her mother. It certainly puts a different perspective on why many of her books have dominant female characters and tend to emphasize the importance of home and family.

“You sound just like Agatha Christie!” My eighty-five year old mother declared.

“Hardly,” I grumbled as I stared in panic at a blank computer screen.

“Do you know your plot?”

“Of course I do,” I said. “It’s in my head.”

“That’s what I meant, darling.” Mum said. “Agatha gave a radio interview with the BBC in 1955 and was asked about her writing method. She said the real work is done in thinking out the development of the story and worrying about it until it comes right. Then, you just have to find the time to write it.”           

“I know.”

 “And to think she wrote 66 mystery novels, 153 short stories and six romance novels.”

“Even if I wrote five books a year until I died,” I said. “I’ll never be so prolific.”

“Of course you will!” Mum said firmly. “But only you can do it. No one can do it for you. Just roll up your sleeves and get on with it! That’s what Agatha’s mother would have said.”

[Such certainty is a mother's prerogative...]