Discount: <i>Still Missing</i> by Chevy Stevens Discount: Still Missing by Chevy Stevens Crime HQ Get a digital copy for only $2.99 through February! <i>The Lioness Is the Hunter</i>: New Excerpt The Lioness Is the Hunter: New Excerpt Loren D. Estleman The 26th book in the Amos Walker series. Review: <i>Till Death</i> by Jennifer L. Armentrout Review: Till Death by Jennifer L. Armentrout David Cranmer Read David Cranmer's review! <i>Grim Death and Bill the Electrocuted Criminal</i>: New Excerpt Grim Death and Bill the Electrocuted Criminal: New Excerpt Mike Mignola and Tom Sniegoski
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Showing posts by: David Cranmer click to see David Cranmer's profile
Wed
Feb 22 2017 3:00pm

Review: Till Death by Jennifer L. Armentrout

Till Death by Jennifer L. Armentrout is a gripping thriller that follows a young woman who comes home to reclaim her life—even as a murderer plots to end it (available February 28, 2017).

Reaching for the pantheon of serial killer novels comes Jennifer Armentrout’s Till Death, with a narrative that begins by staking claim on a terrain already littered with flags.

Dim artificial light was her home now. The musky, earthy scent would be with her right down to the very last breath she took, and that scent would clog her pores and cling to her hair.

This would be her final place.

The woman tipped her head back against the damp brick wall. The terror in her gaze gave way to pleading. Always did. So fucking predictable. So pointless. There was no hope here. There was no chance of a miracle. Once they came here, there was no knight riding to the rescue.

She’s under the sadistic control of the “Groom,” a sicko who’d had a flawless record of torture and death until ten years ago when Sasha Keeton managed to get away—and he has not forgotten.

[Read David Cranmer's review of Till Death...]

Tue
Feb 21 2017 12:00pm

The Dark Tower: Wizard and Glass, Part VII

Last week, the cards were turned and plans were set into motion. This week, we get our final showdown between the young gunslingers and Farson's men. 

Thank you for joining me on a journey of Stephen King’s Wizard and Glass (1997), the 4th book in The Dark Tower series. When we left Roland, Jake, Susannah, Eddie, and Oy the billy-bumbler, they were trapped on the psychotic locomotive, Blaine the Mono, crossing through the feared waste lands. Our ka-tet had narrowly escaped the destruction of Lud that Blaine had decimated with gas—but for what? To become prisoners aboard a train bulleting into a desolate hell populated by fierce beasts, with a guide that’s clearly mad. Yeah, it looks like we are bound to have a helluva lot of fun as we continue our journey to the Dark Tower.

 *Remember: While this is a reread, please avoid spoilers in the comments. The point is to get there together!

We're back to wacky Stephen King chapters, so the plan is to read a section a week (about 100 pages) and meet here at our usual time (Tuesday at 12 p.m. ET) to discuss major themes, motifs, and reactions. Make sure to bookmark the HQ page for the schedule and links to all of the chapter discussions as they go live! This week, we finally get our big showdown! Join us in the comments for a discussion of Part VII of Wizard and Glass: Come, Reap: Chapter 8 “The Ashes” – Chapter 9: “Reaping”!


CrimeHQ's The Dark Tower Reread


[There's gonna be a showdown...]

Fri
Feb 17 2017 3:00pm

Doctor Who: The Greatest Mystery and Horror Tales (2005-2015)

The Doctor is an alien humanoid over two thousand years old, has two hearts, and has regenerated a dozen times (uh, thirteen if you count The War Doctor). He’s a Time Lord from the planet Gallifrey traveling in a sentient time machine known as a TARDIS—“Time and Relative Dimension(s) in Space.” He regularly seeks out evil and squashes it with sometimes nothing more than his superior intellect and a sonic screwdriver. Yes, very much a science-fiction program, but in the BBC show’s rich 54-year history, it has run the gamut of genres. The following are some of the best recent offerings of mystery and horror:

[Let's travel back in time...]

Tue
Feb 14 2017 12:00pm

The Dark Tower: Wizard and Glass, Part VI

Last week, the tension built as the man in black showed up in Mejis. This week, plans are set in motion as we move towards a final showdown. 

Thank you for joining me on a journey of Stephen King’s Wizard and Glass (1997), the 4th book in The Dark Tower series. When we left Roland, Jake, Susannah, Eddie, and Oy the billy-bumbler, they were trapped on the psychotic locomotive, Blaine the Mono, crossing through the feared waste lands. Our ka-tet had narrowly escaped the destruction of Lud that Blaine had decimated with gas—but for what? To become prisoners aboard a train bulleting into a desolate hell populated by fierce beasts, with a guide that’s clearly mad. Yeah, it looks like we are bound to have a helluva lot of fun as we continue our journey to the Dark Tower.

 *Remember: While this is a reread, please avoid spoilers in the comments. The point is to get there together!

We're back to wacky Stephen King chapters, so the plan is to read a section a week (about 100 pages) and meet here at our usual time (Tuesday at 12 p.m. ET) to discuss major themes, motifs, and reactions. Make sure to bookmark the HQ page for the schedule and links to all of the chapter discussions as they go live! This week, plans are set in motion and our ka-tet finds themselves arrested for treason. Join us in the comments for a discussion of Part VI of Wizard and Glass: Come, Reap: Chapter 5 “Wizard's Rainbow” – Chapter 7: “Taking the Ball”!


CrimeHQ's The Dark Tower Reread


[There's gonna be a showdown...]

Thu
Feb 9 2017 3:30pm

Review: Zodiac by Sam Wilson

Zodiac by Sam Wilson is a startling new thriller with one of the most original concepts in years, where the line between a life of luxury and an existence of poverty can be determined by the stroke of midnight.

Here's an offbeat dystopian premise: a society divided and governed by Zodiac signs, where all walks of life—from the top-tier elites right down to the bottom-rung proletariats—are viewed through the prism of the astrological sign under which they are born that binds them to their particular lot in life. 

Our story opens in the city of San Celeste with Rachel, one of the working class who is employed by JiffyMaids. She arrives at the house where she is scheduled to clean and stops cold in her tracks when she notices the door has been forced open. She dials 911, and the dispatcher—who Rachel is glad to hear is a Libra—instructs her to stay put.

[Read David Cranmer's review of Zodiac...]

Tue
Feb 7 2017 2:00pm

Review: The Nightwalker by Sebastian Fitzek

The Nightwalker by Sebastian Fitzek is a psychological thrill-ride of a novel that finds an insomniac wondering if his nighttime excursions have turned into something beyond his imagination.

Architect Leon Nader is a 28-year-old insomniac, and it’s a vast understatement to say the condition is wreaking havoc on his life. As Sebastian Fitzek’s The Nightwalker opens, Leon’s wife Natalie is leaving him. He begs her to reconsider, but she exits their apartment and their life. She takes the elevator, but when it opens on the ground floor—Leon ran the stairs in a last ditch attempt at reconciliation—it’s empty. 

Later, he calls his parents to see if they have heard from Natalie, but they are away on a cruise. The quirky couple left a message on their answering machine bragging that their trip had been paid in full by their son—a confused Leon never gifted them such a present.

[Read David Cranmer's review of The Nightwalker...]

Tue
Feb 7 2017 12:00pm

The Dark Tower: Wizard and Glass, Part V

Last week, true intentions surfaced and a forbidden love was consummated. This week, tension builds as the man in black shows up in Mejis and the ka-tet's trust and friendship is tested. 

Thank you for joining me on a journey of Stephen King’s Wizard and Glass (1997), the 4th book in The Dark Tower series. When we left Roland, Jake, Susannah, Eddie, and Oy the billy-bumbler, they were trapped on the psychotic locomotive, Blaine the Mono, crossing through the feared waste lands. Our ka-tet had narrowly escaped the destruction of Lud that Blaine had decimated with gas—but for what? To become prisoners aboard a train bulleting into a desolate hell populated by fierce beasts, with a guide that’s clearly mad. Yeah, it looks like we are bound to have a helluva lot of fun as we continue our journey to the Dark Tower.

 *Remember: While this is a reread, please avoid spoilers in the comments. The point is to get there together!

We're back to wacky Stephen King chapters, so the plan is to read a section a week (about 100 pages) and meet here at our usual time (Tuesday at 12 p.m. ET) to discuss major themes, motifs, and reactions. Make sure to bookmark the HQ page for the schedule and links to all of the chapter discussions as they go live! This week, the tension reaches its boiling point as the man in black shows up in Mejis and our ka-tet seems splintered. Join us in the comments for a discussion of Part V of Wizard and Glass: Come, Reap: Chapter 1 “Beneath the Huntress Moon” – Chapter 4: “Roland and Cuthbert”!


CrimeHQ's The Dark Tower Reread


[“Call me Walter,” the man in black said...]

Tue
Jan 31 2017 2:00pm

Review: Winterlong by Mason Cross

Winterlong by Mason Cross is the 3rd book in the Carter Blake thriller series and a deadly game of cat and mouse filled with high stakes tension (available February 7, 2017).

A secret US-based military organization is on a deadly mission to close out an at-large loose end. The newly appointed head of this clandestine unit, Emma Faraday, browses the file of their target.

The green eyes stared back at her from the DMV photograph, as though aware of her gaze.

The subject had the ideal skill set for the work they did. An expert tracker, good with people in every way that mattered, above average on the firing range, adept in unarmed combat. A strategic thinker, too, able to respond creatively to changing conditions on the ground. Both a thinker and a warrior. Carter Blake would be a perfect asset, if she were recruiting.

But more likely, within thirty-six hours, he would be dead.

Blake is accused of killing a United States senator and his wife over a “botched deal to leak sensitive files.” Faraday briefs twelve assassins on the Blake file, and—here’s the kick—he used to be employed by Faraday’s group so he knows a thing or two about the hell descending on him and what it will take to survive against the odds. Winterlong’s back blurb sums it up: “If there’s anyone who can find him—and kill him—it’s them.”

[Read David Cranmer's review of Winterlong...]

Tue
Jan 31 2017 12:00pm

The Dark Tower: Wizard and Glass, Part IV

Last week, Roland and Susan struggled with their feelings for each other. This week, secrets abound as the gunslingers learn of Farson's plan in Mejis, the Big Coffin Hunters learn of the gunslingers true background, and Roland and Susan throw caution to the wind by consummating their forbidden love

Thank you for joining me on a journey of Stephen King’s Wizard and Glass (1997), the 4th book in The Dark Tower series. When we left Roland, Jake, Susannah, Eddie, and Oy the billy-bumbler, they were trapped on the psychotic locomotive, Blaine the Mono, crossing through the feared waste lands. Our ka-tet had narrowly escaped the destruction of Lud that Blaine had decimated with gas—but for what? To become prisoners aboard a train bulleting into a desolate hell populated by fierce beasts, with a guide that’s clearly mad. Yeah, it looks like we are bound to have a helluva lot of fun as we continue our journey to the Dark Tower.

 *Remember: While this is a reread, please avoid spoilers in the comments. The point is to get there together!

We're back to wacky Stephen King chapters, so the plan is to read a section a week (about 100 pages) and meet here at our usual time (Tuesday at 12 p.m. ET) to discuss major themes, motifs, and reactions. Make sure to bookmark the HQ page for the schedule and links to all of the chapter discussions as they go live! This week, secrets abound as the tension builds all around Mejis. Join us in the comments for a discussion of Part IV of Wizard and Glass: Susan: Chapter 8 “Beneath the Peddler's Moon” – Interlude: “Kansas, Somewhere, Somewhen”!


CrimeHQ's The Dark Tower Reread


[Secrets, secrets are no fun...]

Tue
Jan 24 2017 12:00pm

The Dark Tower: Wizard and Glass, Part III

Last week, we traveled back to Mejis to learn of Roland's backstory. This week, the romance between Roland and Susan flourishes as we meet our villains: The Big Coffin Hunters

Thank you for joining me on a journey of Stephen King’s Wizard and Glass (1997), the 4th book in The Dark Tower series. When we left Roland, Jake, Susannah, Eddie, and Oy the billy-bumbler, they were trapped on the psychotic locomotive, Blaine the Mono, crossing through the feared waste lands. Our ka-tet had narrowly escaped the destruction of Lud that Blaine had decimated with gas—but for what? To become prisoners aboard a train bulleting into a desolate hell populated by fierce beasts, with a guide that’s clearly mad. Yeah, it looks like we are bound to have a helluva lot of fun as we continue our journey to the Dark Tower.

 *Remember: While this is a reread, please avoid spoilers in the comments. The point is to get there together!

We're back to wacky Stephen King chapters, so the plan is to read a section a week (about 100 pages) and meet here at our usual time (Tuesday at 12 p.m. ET) to discuss major themes, motifs, and reactions. Make sure to bookmark the HQ page for the schedule and links to all of the chapter discussions as they go live! This week, Roland falls hard for Susan as we meet our villains: The Big Coffin Hunters. Join us in the comments for a discussion of Part III of Wizard and Glass: Susan: Chapter 5 “Welcome to Town” – Chapter 7 “On the Drop”!


CrimeHQ's The Dark Tower Reread


[Introducing The Big Coffin Hunters...]

Tue
Jan 17 2017 12:00pm

The Dark Tower: Wizard and Glass, Part II

Last week, we began Wizard and Glass by defeating Blaine the Mono and ending up in some when's Topeka, Kansas. This week, we begin Roland's backstory in Mejis and meet the beautiful Susan Delgado

Thank you for joining me on a journey of Stephen King’s Wizard and Glass (1997), the 4th book in The Dark Tower series. When we left Roland, Jake, Susannah, Eddie, and Oy the billy-bumbler, they were trapped on the psychotic locomotive, Blaine the Mono, crossing through the feared waste lands. Our ka-tet had narrowly escaped the destruction of Lud that Blaine had decimated with gas—but for what? To become prisoners aboard a train bulleting into a desolate hell populated by fierce beasts, with a guide that’s clearly mad. Yeah, it looks like we are bound to have a helluva lot of fun as we continue our journey to the Dark Tower.

 *Remember: While this is a reread, please avoid spoilers in the comments. The point is to get there together!

We're back to wacky Stephen King chapters, so the plan is to read a section a week (about 100 pages) and meet here at our usual time (Tuesday at 12 p.m. ET) to discuss major themes, motifs, and reactions. Make sure to bookmark the HQ page for the schedule and links to all of the chapter discussions as they go live! This week, we begin Roland's backstory in Mejis and finally meet the beautiful Susan Delgado. Join us in the comments for a discussion of Part II of Wizard and Glass: Susan: Chapter 1 “Beneath the Kissing Moon” – Chapter 4 “Long After Moonset”!


CrimeHQ's The Dark Tower Reread


[Introducing the beautiful Susan Delgado...]

Thu
Jan 12 2017 12:00pm

Review: An Unsettling Crime for Samuel Craddock by Terry Shames

An Unsettling Crime for Samuel Craddock by Terry Shames is the 6th book in the Samuel Craddock Mystery series.

For first time readers of Terry Shames’s Samuel Craddock series, of which I’m one, An Unsettling Crime For Samuel Craddock seems an optimal time to jump on board. Described as a prequel, we join Craddock in the 1980s as the newly appointed Chief of Police of tiny Jarrett Creek, Texas: population 3,000. He’s tested by fire—literally and figuratively—in his first year with the murders of five young people on the outskirts of town.

As soon as I opened the door the smell hits me. The smell of burning creosote is strongest, but there’s another smell underneath that turns my stomach. Burned flesh. Somebody didn’t make it out alive.

Besides the house being torched, some of the deceased had also been shot to death prior. On the scene is John Sutherland, a racist state patrolman who belittles Craddock’s youth and inexperience and attempts to assert his authority at every turn. Craddock stands his ground, pointing out that it happened in the city limits and is part of his dominion, though, he later admits, it has nothing to do with his office. He reaches out to Albert Lamond, the self-appointed leader of the black community who is understandably leery of working with law enforcement. Also on the scene are the far more welcoming Texas Rangers, who offer their assistance in any way possible—a mini life raft, of sorts, for a man who is in way over his head and bemoaning the fact a little too late that this job will be a mite more involved than locking up the occasional drunk.

Read an excerpt from An Unsettling Crime for Samuel Craddock!

[Read David Cranmer's review of An Unsettling Crime for Samuel Craddock...]

Wed
Jan 11 2017 1:00pm

Review: Creation in Death by J.D. Robb

To celebrate the upcoming release of J.D. Robb's 44th Eve Dallas mystery, Echoes in Death, we're taking a look back at every single book in the In Death series. Today, David Cranmer reviews #25, Creation in Death.

It’s March of 2060, and Lieutenant Eve Dallas has a rare couple of days off. She’s enjoying a movie with Roarke and has no other plans except to “nail her husband like an air jack” after the video ends. But before they can consummate the evening on such a candid note, Eve gets a call from her commander directing her to a homicide. Roarke asks to tag along—as he often does—promising to stay out of the way, and what they find is revolting:

It might have been a sheet of ice or snow. From a distance, it might appear to be. And from a distance, the body arranged on it might appear to be artful—a model for some edgy shoot.

But she knew what it was, even from a distance, and the line of cold up her spine took on teeth.

Her eyes met Morris’s. But they said nothing.

It wasn’t ice, or snow. She wasn’t a model or a piece of art.

The victim is identified as 28-year-old Sarifina York, and in a rather too convenient plot twist, Roarke is acquainted with the young woman, having hired her to manage a club.

But her killer is no stranger, per se, either. He’s is well known to Eve from several unsolved murders dating nine years back and has been dubbed “The Groom” because of his signature calling card: a ring that he places on the deceased’s finger. Sprinkled throughout the novel, we are privy to The Groom’s disturbed mind. He considers what he’s doing an art form, and he carves into the skin of his captives how long they survived, right down to the second. The prologue for Creation in Death sums up the clinical, psychotic killer that Lieutenant Eve Dallas is up against with this go around.

Death was, in and of itself, the all.

He considered himself a late bloomer, and often bemoaned the years before he’d found his raison d’être. All that time lost, all those opportunities missed. But still, he had bloomed, and was forever grateful that he had finally looked inside himself and seen what he was. What he was meant for.

He was a maestro in the art of death. The keeper of time. The bringer of destiny.

Antagonists of this nature—the kind of serial killers that deem themselves erudite with fine taste—always reminds me of the big dog on the front porch, Hannibal Lecter. In particular, The Silence of the Lambs by Thomas Harris is the standard by which I govern their ilk. Though “The Groom” is not as original as “Hannibal the Cannibal,” he’s nevertheless a worthy adversary as he begins circling closer and closer to Eve, intent on making her his last victim … and his ultimate creation.

As in all the In Death books, focus is squarely on hardboiled Eve Dallas, who has gone from being a loner in the earlier part of the series to being surrounded by a loyal group of supporters, like the ever-ready Peabody and billionaire husband Roarke, who I’ve always pictured as Lee Horsley from the Matt Houston series. A super rich dude who never lost the connection to the common man and has the grit that a tough-as-nails cop like Eve can respect. Whether she likes to admit it or not, he grounds her and makes her a more sympathetic person.

An excellent futuristic crime procedural, but don’t take my word for it. Stephen King said, “If you haven’t read Robb, this is a great place to start.” And from the late Robert B. Parker, “Creation in Death is a complete pleasure. WONDERFUL!”

 

To learn more or order a copy, visit:

Buy at iTunes

Buy at Barnes and NobleBuy at Amazon

 

 


David Cranmer is the publisher and editor of BEAT to a PULP. Latest books from this indie powerhouse include the alternate history novella Leviathan and sci-fi adventure Pale Mars. David lives in New York with his wife and daughter.

Tue
Jan 10 2017 1:00pm

Review: Innocent in Death by J.D. Robb

To celebrate the upcoming release of J.D. Robb's 44th Eve Dallas mystery, Echoes in Death, we're taking a look back at every single book in the In Death series. Today, David Cranmer reviews #24, Innocent in Death.

A young, seemingly healthy history teacher, Craig Foster, dies at work while eating lunch alone in his classroom. Craig was recently married to a woman named Lissette and, according to his co-workers and the student body, was a beloved educator. Lieutenant Eve Dallas and her assistant Peabody are called to investigate.

Spider legs of broken vessels ran through the whites of his eyes. There were traces of foam as well as vomit clinging to his lips. “Tried to crawl after it hit him,” she murmured. “Tried to crawl for the door. Get the formal ID, Peabody, verify TOD.”

Rising, Eve moved carefully around the puddles of what Craig's body had voided, and picked up the insulated cup she saw, which had his name engraved in silver over black. Sniffed.

“You think somebody poisoned this guy?” Peabody asked.

[Read David Cranmer's review of Innocent in Death...]

Tue
Jan 10 2017 12:00pm

The Dark Tower: Wizard and Glass, Part I

Last week, we finished up The Waste Lands with a pain of a cliffhanger. Thankfully, we only had to wait 6 days instead of 6 years to find out what happens! This week, our ka-tet tries to outriddle Blaine the Mono as they speed through the waste lands towards Topeka, Kansas

Thank you for joining me on a journey of Stephen King’s Wizard and Glass (1997), the 4th book in The Dark Tower series. When we left Roland, Jake, Susannah, Eddie, and Oy the billy-bumbler, they were trapped on the psychotic locomotive, Blaine the Mono, crossing through the feared waste lands. Our ka-tet had narrowly escaped the destruction of Lud that Blaine had decimated with gas—but for what? To become prisoners aboard a train bulleting into a desolate hell populated by fierce beasts, with a guide that’s clearly mad. Yeah, it looks like we are bound to have a helluva lot of fun as we continue our journey to the Dark Tower.

 *Remember: While this is a reread, please avoid spoilers in the comments. The point is to get there together!

We're back to wacky Stephen King chapters, so the plan is to read a section a week (about 100 pages) and meet here at our usual time (Tuesday at 12 p.m. ET) to discuss major themes, motifs, and reactions. Make sure to bookmark the HQ page for the schedule and links to all of the chapter discussions as they go live! This week, we finally get an answer about what happened with Blaine the Mono, as our ka-tet tries to outriddle a psychotic speeding train. Join us in the comments for a discussion of Part I of Wizard and Glass: Riddles!


CrimeHQ's The Dark Tower Reread


[Riddle me this...]

Tue
Jan 3 2017 12:00pm

The Dark Tower: The Waste Lands, Part VI

Last week, we snaked our way through the underbelly of the city of Lud. This week, we meet Blaine the Mono and find out why Blaine is such a pain

Thank you for joining me on a journey of Stephen King’s The Waste Lands (1991), the 3rd book in The Dark Tower series. We just finished our journey across the beach in The Drawing of the Three, drawing Eddie and Susannah Dean into Roland's world and ending the pitiful life of Jack Mort. Eddie is off heroin, and Susannah's previously split mind has merged into one—but Roland Deschain is troubled. It seems by killing Jack Mort and allowing Jake Chambers to live, he has created a paradox ... and it's tearing his mind apart. What's next for this new ka-tet? Will Roland be able to rectify this butterfly effect? Join us as we make our way into The Waste Lands!

 *Remember: While this is a reread, please avoid spoilers in the comments. The point is to get there together!

This book's chapters set up nicely, so the plan is to read a chapter a week (about 100 pages) and meet here at our usual time (Tuesday at 12 p.m. ET) to discuss major themes, motifs, and reactions. Make sure to bookmark the HQ page for the schedule and links to all of the chapter discussions as they go live! This week, we meet Blaine the Mono and find out why Blaine is such a pain as he speeds our gunslingers out of the horrifying city of Lud. Join us in the comments for a discussion of Part VI of The Waste Lands: BOOK TWO LUD: A HEAP OF BROKEN IMAGES, Chapter VI: “Riddle and Waste Lands”!


CrimeHQ's The Dark Tower Reread


[Riddle me this...]

Mon
Jan 2 2017 12:00pm

Review: The Hollow Men by Rob McCarthy

The Hollow Men by Rob McCarthy follows police surgeon Harry Kent, who's determined to help those the world would rather brush aside, in a smart and electrifying new crime series that evokes the often-hidden medical world of the London Metropolitan Police.

Dr. Harry Kent has been performing low-risk functions such as psychological assessments for the London Metropolitan Police that have kept him far from harm’s way—up until now. Called in because the police are shorthanded, he finds himself being given a Kevlar vest and asked to walk past a perimeter of snipers to negotiate with Solomon Idris, who has taken eight people hostage at a fast food restaurant. He's understandably nervous as he makes a mental comparison with his combat past.

[Read David Cranmer's review of The Hollow Men...]

Wed
Dec 28 2016 1:00pm

Review: Purity in Death by J.D. Robb

To celebrate the upcoming release of J.D. Robb's 44th Eve Dallas mystery, Echoes in Death, we're taking a look back at every single book in the In Death series. Today, David Cranmer reviews #15, Purity in Death.

Lieutenant Eve Dallas of Cop Central is preparing to attend an evening soirée with her husband, Roarke, who’s rich enough “to buy a couple of continents.” But she is relieved of the snooty affair when she’s notified that one of her men, off-duty Officer Troy Trueheart, has shot and killed a man named Louis K. Cogburn. Screaming about the spikes in his head, Cogburn took a baseball bat to his neighbor Ralph Wooster, beat him to death, and then went swinging after Wooster’s girlfriend, Suzanne. By the time Eve and her assistant Peabody arrive at the apartment building, they discover:

Two men lay sprawled in the corridor, one of them facedown in a pool of congealing blood. 

The other was faceup, staring with some surprise at the ceiling. Through an open doorway beside the bodies she could hear the sounds of weeping and groaning. 

The door across was also open. She noted several fresh holes and dents in the hallway walls, splinters of wallboard, splatters of blood. And what had once been a baseball bat was now a broken club, covered with blood and brain matter.

[Read David Cranmer's review of Purity in Death...]

Tue
Dec 20 2016 12:00pm

The Dark Tower: The Waste Lands, Part V

Last week, we learned a bit more about Mid-World and the future for our ka-tet. This week, ramp the action back up as we travel into the city of Lud and meet the Pubes and the Grays

Thank you for joining me on a journey of Stephen King’s The Waste Lands (1991), the 3rd book in The Dark Tower series. We just finished our journey across the beach in The Drawing of the Three, drawing Eddie and Susannah Dean into Roland's world and ending the pitiful life of Jack Mort. Eddie is off heroin, and Susannah's previously split mind has merged into one—but Roland Deschain is troubled. It seems by killing Jack Mort and allowing Jake Chambers to live, he has created a paradox ... and it's tearing his mind apart. What's next for this new ka-tet? Will Roland be able to rectify this butterfly effect? Join us as we make our way into The Waste Lands!

 *Remember: While this is a reread, please avoid spoilers in the comments. The point is to get there together!

This book's chapters set up nicely, so the plan is to read a chapter a week (about 100 pages) and meet here at our usual time (Tuesday at 12 p.m. ET) to discuss major themes, motifs, and reactions. Make sure to bookmark the HQ page for the schedule and links to all of the chapter discussions as they go live! This week, we get an action-packed chase as we snake our way through the city of Lud. Join us in the comments for a discussion of Part V of The Waste Lands: BOOK TWO LUD: A HEAP OF BROKEN IMAGES, Chapter V: “Bridge and City”!


CrimeHQ's The Dark Tower Reread


[Riddle me this...]

Tue
Dec 13 2016 12:00pm

The Dark Tower: The Waste Lands, Part IV

Last week, Jake Chambers returned to Roland's world in an incredibly tense scene featuring a monster haunted house. This week, we slow down a bit to learn more of Mid-World and the future for this newly formed ka-tet

Thank you for joining me on a journey of Stephen King’s The Waste Lands (1991), the 3rd book in The Dark Tower series. We just finished our journey across the beach in The Drawing of the Three, drawing Eddie and Susannah Dean into Roland's world and ending the pitiful life of Jack Mort. Eddie is off heroin, and Susannah's previously split mind has merged into one—but Roland Deschain is troubled. It seems by killing Jack Mort and allowing Jake Chambers to live, he has created a paradox ... and it's tearing his mind apart. What's next for this new ka-tet? Will Roland be able to rectify this butterfly effect? Join us as we make our way into The Waste Lands!

 *Remember: While this is a reread, please avoid spoilers in the comments. The point is to get there together!

This book's chapters set up nicely, so the plan is to read a chapter a week (about 100 pages) and meet here at our usual time (Tuesday at 12 p.m. ET) to discuss major themes, motifs, and reactions. Make sure to bookmark the HQ page for the schedule and links to all of the chapter discussions as they go live! This week, we meet an incredibly adorable billy-bumbler named Oy and learn more of Mid-World and our newly formed ka-tet. Join us in the comments for a discussion of Part IV of The Waste Lands: BOOK TWO LUD: A HEAP OF BROKEN IMAGES, Chapter IV: “Town and Ka-Tet”!


CrimeHQ's The Dark Tower Reread


[Oy!]