<i>The Wages of Sin</i>: New Excerpt The Wages of Sin: New Excerpt Kaite Welsh A page-turning debut of murder, subversion, and vice. Review: <i>Baker Street Irregulars</i> Review: Baker Street Irregulars Amber Keller Read Amber Keller's review! <i>The Lost Order</i>: New Excerpt The Lost Order: New Excerpt Steve Berry The 12th book in the Cotton Malone series. Review: <i>The New York Times Book of Crime</i>, Edited by Kevin Flynn Review: The New York Times Book of Crime, Edited by Kevin Flynn Jenny Maloney Read Jenny Maloney's review!
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Q&A with Gretchen Archer, Author of Double Up
Crime HQ and Gretchen Archer
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Research Ride-Along
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Q&A with Lyndsay Faye, Author of The Whole Art of Detection
Lyndsay Faye and Ardi Alspach
Showing posts by: David Cranmer click to see David Cranmer's profile
Tue
Mar 21 2017 12:00pm

The Dark Tower: The Wind Through the Keyhole Part II

Last week, we began The Wind Through the Keyhole with a major storm and another of Roland's stories. This week, we get a story within a story within a story! 

In Wizard and Glass, we discovered that Roland had accidentally killed his mother and returned a crystal ball from Maerlyn’s Rainbow to his father. His newest ka-tet—Jake, Susannah, Eddie, and Oy—are following The Path of the Beam when they encounter Marten, now calling himself Randall Flagg, in a twisted version of Emerald City. Roland just misses killing Flagg but managed to gun down Andrew Quick, aka Tick-Tock Man, who was working for Flagg.

The Wind Through The Keyhole was written to chronologically follow Wizard and Glass even though it was released in 2012, long after the 7th novel, The Dark Tower (2004). For that reason, we have decided to continue Roland’s adventures in sequential order since Stephen King calls it The Dark Tower 4.5.

Come join us … before the world moves on.

*Remember: While this is a reread, please avoid spoilers in the comments. The point is to get there together!

This is a shorter book with only five sections, so the plan is to split the book into three parts (about 100 pages each) and meet here at our usual time (Tuesday at 12 p.m. ET) to discuss major themes, motifs, and reactions. Make sure to bookmark the HQ page for the schedule and links to all of the chapter discussions as they go live! This week, we get a story within a story within a story! Join us in the comments for a discussion of Part II of The Wind Through the Keyhole: The Wind Through the Keyhole!


CrimeHQ's The Dark Tower Reread


[Storyception...]

Wed
Mar 15 2017 1:00pm

Review: The Will to Kill by Max Allan Collins and Mickey Spillane

The Will to Kill is the latest Mike Hammer novel, originally started by the now-deceased Mickey Spillane and finished by the deft hand of Max Allan Collins. 

Mike Hammer predates James Bond and was a contemporary of Phillip Marlowe. Let that history sink in, and then celebrate that we have a brand-new Hammer novel.

Typically, I’d say it’s not a cause to rejoice, because Spillane died in 2006, and, hell, what would Mike Hammer be up to these days at an age of about one hundred years old? If he was lucky enough, probably solving the case of the missing dentures from the retirement home. But, in the event you are not aware, here’s the drill: when Spillane died, he had a bunch of Hammer manuscripts in varying degrees of completion and instructed his wife to pass them to his padawan learner, Max Allan Collins to complete. So, in a nutshell, this new non-Spillane novel isn’t an estate trying to cash in—as so many do—instead, it’s Collins finishing off the Hammer legacy that Spillane started with I, the Jury in 1947.

In M.A.C.’s opening co-author’s note, he estimates that this latest adventure (of which Spillane wrote roughly thirty pages) takes place in 1965, so our hero is a little older but still battle ready.

[Read David Cranmer's review of The Will to Kill...]

Tue
Mar 14 2017 4:00pm

Mathematical Mysteries, Sci-Fi, and Thrillers

Math and science enthusiasts come together with the mystery/thriller genres to make arithmetic artistry. Following up on a previous post, Movies + Math = A Beautiful Formula, here are five more scintillating titles to add to your viewing list.

[See what you should add to your watch list...]

Tue
Mar 14 2017 12:00pm

The Dark Tower: The Wind Through the Keyhole Part I

Last week, we ended Wizard and Glass in a makeshift Emerald City before Maerlyn's Rainbow trainsported them back onto The Path of the Beam. This week, we begin The Wind Through the Keyhole with a major storm and the beginning of another of Roland's stories! 

In Wizard and Glass, we discovered that Roland had accidentally killed his mother and returned a crystal ball from Maerlyn’s Rainbow to his father. His newest ka-tet—Jake, Susannah, Eddie, and Oy—are following The Path of the Beam when they encounter Marten, now calling himself Randall Flagg, in a twisted version of Emerald City. Roland just misses killing Flagg but managed to gun down Andrew Quick, aka Tick-Tock Man, who was working for Flagg.

The Wind Through The Keyhole was written to chronologically follow Wizard and Glass even though it was released in 2012, long after the 7th novel, The Dark Tower (2004). For that reason, we have decided to continue Roland’s adventures in sequential order since Stephen King calls it The Dark Tower 4.5.

Come join us … before the world moves on.

*Remember: While this is a reread, please avoid spoilers in the comments. The point is to get there together!

This is a shorter book with only five sections, so the plan is to split the book into three parts (about 100 pages each) and meet here at our usual time (Tuesday at 12 p.m. ET) to discuss major themes, motifs, and reactions. Make sure to bookmark the HQ page for the schedule and links to all of the chapter discussions as they go live! This week, we begin The Wind Through the Keyhole with a major storm and the beginning of another of Roland's stories. Join us in the comments for a discussion of Part I of The Wind Through the Keyhole: Starkblast – The Skin-Man (Part 1)!


CrimeHQ's The Dark Tower Reread


[There's a starkblast coming...]

Mon
Mar 13 2017 12:00pm

Review: Heretics by Leonardo Padura

Heretics by Leonardo Padura is a sweeping novel of art theft, anti-Semitism, contemporary Cuba, and crime from a renowned Cuban author (available March 14, 2017).

Within the pages of Leonardo Padura’s latest Mario Conde adventure, the reader can’t help noticing that atmosphere dominates—that squalor kind of atmosphere found in Raymond Chandler’s dirty Los Angeles streets or, more recently, the “Appalachian noir” of David Joy. Here is the demoralized vibe of 2007’s Havana:

Thus, while some subsisted on the dollars sent by their children who had gone off to anywhere in the world but there, others tried to do what they could to avoid falling into absolute poverty or jail: work as private tutors, drivers who rented out their battered cars, self-employed veterinarians or masseuses, whatever came up. But the option to make a living clawing at the walls wasn’t easy and caused that stellar exhaustion, the feeling of constant uncertainty and irreversible defeat that frequently gripped the former policeman and drove him, with one rough push, against his will and desires to hit the streets looking for old books that would earn him, at least, a few pesos to survive.

[Read David Cranmer's review of Heretics...]

Tue
Mar 7 2017 1:00pm

The Dark Tower: Wizard and Glass, Part IX

Last week, victory was bittersweet as Roland learned of his true destiny. This week, we return to our current when and ka-tet ... and Emerald City? 

Thank you for joining me on a journey of Stephen King’s Wizard and Glass (1997), the 4th book in The Dark Tower series. When we left Roland, Jake, Susannah, Eddie, and Oy the billy-bumbler, they were trapped on the psychotic locomotive, Blaine the Mono, crossing through the feared waste lands. Our ka-tet had narrowly escaped the destruction of Lud that Blaine had decimated with gas—but for what? To become prisoners aboard a train bulleting into a desolate hell populated by fierce beasts, with a guide that’s clearly mad. Yeah, it looks like we are bound to have a helluva lot of fun as we continue our journey to the Dark Tower.

 *Remember: While this is a reread, please avoid spoilers in the comments. The point is to get there together!

We're back to wacky Stephen King chapters, so the plan is to read a section a week (about 100 pages) and meet here at our usual time (Tuesday at 12 p.m. ET) to discuss major themes, motifs, and reactions. Make sure to bookmark the HQ page for the schedule and links to all of the chapter discussions as they go live! This week, we return to our current when and ka-tet, who are off to meet the wizard. Join us in the comments for a discussion of Part IX of Wizard and Glass: All God's Chillun Got Shoes!


CrimeHQ's The Dark Tower Reread


[We're off to see the wizard...]

Mon
Mar 6 2017 5:30pm

Review: The Devil’s Bible by Dana Chamblee Carpenter

The Devil's Bible by Dana Chamblee Carpenter is the 2nd book in the Bohemian Gospel series (available March 7, 2017).

Dana Chamblee Carpenter’s story begins in Avignon in the year 1236. A dying woman has given birth to a baby girl, which is not what the father was hoping for, and he uses “his claws” to rip the attending doctor’s throat from his body. As the sawbones realizes—a little too late—that this is his last house call, a nurse manages to whisk the infant to safety.

This girl—this disappointment—would live. For now. He needed to turn his thoughts toward his next conquest—the one that would profit him a son. He took the edge of his cloak and pulled it over his shoulder, folding himself into the blackness of the night.

Cowering in the deeper dark of a bend in the alley not far past the still gaping door, the nurse laid her face gently against the baby’s head, silently pleading: Don’t make a sound. Be quiet. Quiet as a little mouse.

I’ve always wondered about fictional characters with the coveted “gift” of immortality: when do the centuries take their toll? How much personal loss can an immortal endure before they crumble? It’s been answered recently in an episode of Doctor Who with a peasant girl given perpetual life. At first, she’s joyously happy, then, as the centuries spin around her in a clever rolodex of historical happenings, a deep sadness overtakes her features.

See also: Doctor Who: The Greatest Mystery and Horror Tales (2005-2015)

[Read David Cranmer's review of The Devil's Bible...]

Thu
Mar 2 2017 1:00pm

Review: The Weight of This World by David Joy

In The Weight of This World, David Joy returns to the mountains of North Carolina with a powerful story about the inescapable weight of the past (available March 7, 2017).

There’s a strong thread of uncompromising, dark fiction that's weaved its way back through the literary epochs. I’m not referencing trailblazing titans from Hemingway and Hammett to Cormac McCarthy and Daniel Woodrell, who certainly deserve their veneration, but, well try this: ask a devotee their preference of what we call gritty fiction, and I’m betting they will direct you to the side streets and alleyways alive with the works of Jim Thompson, Flannery O’Connor, Charles Willeford, and Dorothy B. Hughes, to name a few. Currently, writers like David Joy continue that stark, no bullshit tradition, and the author’s latest, The Weight of This World, builds richly on his debut effort, Where All Light Tends to Go, which was named an Edgar finalist for Best First Novel.

For many admirers of this blunt, unapologetic approach, it’s not just the tight plot with an economical use of words that constitute this style, but characters with a sobering realization that the fix is in—that life deals the majority a crap hand, and the chance of rising above the cesspool is highly doubtful. Weight’s prime example is Aiden McCall, who at twelve watched his dad gun down his mother and then take his own life. Despite the coarseness of the material, listen to the poetry in Mr. Joy’s prose (Reed Farrel Coleman calls it “a beautiful nightmare”) as this hardened Appalachian teen realizes the dice have been cast:

[Read David Cranmer's review of The Weight of This World...]

Tue
Feb 28 2017 1:00pm

The Dark Tower: Wizard and Glass, Part VIII

Last week, we began the final showdown with Roland's gang and the Big Coffin Hunters. This week, victory is bittersweet as Roland is faced with his true destiny. 

Thank you for joining me on a journey of Stephen King’s Wizard and Glass (1997), the 4th book in The Dark Tower series. When we left Roland, Jake, Susannah, Eddie, and Oy the billy-bumbler, they were trapped on the psychotic locomotive, Blaine the Mono, crossing through the feared waste lands. Our ka-tet had narrowly escaped the destruction of Lud that Blaine had decimated with gas—but for what? To become prisoners aboard a train bulleting into a desolate hell populated by fierce beasts, with a guide that’s clearly mad. Yeah, it looks like we are bound to have a helluva lot of fun as we continue our journey to the Dark Tower.

 *Remember: While this is a reread, please avoid spoilers in the comments. The point is to get there together!

We're back to wacky Stephen King chapters, so the plan is to read a section a week (about 100 pages) and meet here at our usual time (Tuesday at 12 p.m. ET) to discuss major themes, motifs, and reactions. Make sure to bookmark the HQ page for the schedule and links to all of the chapter discussions as they go live! This week, Roland may have won the battle, but he lost his love. Join us in the comments for a discussion of Part VIII of Wizard and Glass: Come, Reap: Chapter 10 “Beneath the Demon Moon (II)”!


CrimeHQ's The Dark Tower Reread


[ROLAND, I LOVE THEE!]

Wed
Feb 22 2017 4:00pm

Review: Till Death by Jennifer L. Armentrout

Till Death by Jennifer L. Armentrout is a gripping thriller that follows a young woman who comes home to reclaim her life—even as a murderer plots to end it (available February 28, 2017).

Reaching for the pantheon of serial killer novels comes Jennifer Armentrout’s Till Death, with a narrative that begins by staking claim on a terrain already littered with flags.

Dim artificial light was her home now. The musky, earthy scent would be with her right down to the very last breath she took, and that scent would clog her pores and cling to her hair.

This would be her final place.

The woman tipped her head back against the damp brick wall. The terror in her gaze gave way to pleading. Always did. So fucking predictable. So pointless. There was no hope here. There was no chance of a miracle. Once they came here, there was no knight riding to the rescue.

She’s under the sadistic control of the “Groom,” a sicko who’d had a flawless record of torture and death until ten years ago when Sasha Keeton managed to get away—and he has not forgotten.

[Read David Cranmer's review of Till Death...]

Tue
Feb 21 2017 1:00pm

The Dark Tower: Wizard and Glass, Part VII

Last week, the cards were turned and plans were set into motion. This week, we get our final showdown between the young gunslingers and Farson's men. 

Thank you for joining me on a journey of Stephen King’s Wizard and Glass (1997), the 4th book in The Dark Tower series. When we left Roland, Jake, Susannah, Eddie, and Oy the billy-bumbler, they were trapped on the psychotic locomotive, Blaine the Mono, crossing through the feared waste lands. Our ka-tet had narrowly escaped the destruction of Lud that Blaine had decimated with gas—but for what? To become prisoners aboard a train bulleting into a desolate hell populated by fierce beasts, with a guide that’s clearly mad. Yeah, it looks like we are bound to have a helluva lot of fun as we continue our journey to the Dark Tower.

 *Remember: While this is a reread, please avoid spoilers in the comments. The point is to get there together!

We're back to wacky Stephen King chapters, so the plan is to read a section a week (about 100 pages) and meet here at our usual time (Tuesday at 12 p.m. ET) to discuss major themes, motifs, and reactions. Make sure to bookmark the HQ page for the schedule and links to all of the chapter discussions as they go live! This week, we finally get our big showdown! Join us in the comments for a discussion of Part VII of Wizard and Glass: Come, Reap: Chapter 8 “The Ashes” – Chapter 9: “Reaping”!


CrimeHQ's The Dark Tower Reread


[There's gonna be a showdown...]

Fri
Feb 17 2017 4:00pm

Doctor Who: The Greatest Mystery and Horror Tales (2005-2015)

The Doctor is an alien humanoid over two thousand years old, has two hearts, and has regenerated a dozen times (uh, thirteen if you count The War Doctor). He’s a Time Lord from the planet Gallifrey traveling in a sentient time machine known as a TARDIS—“Time and Relative Dimension(s) in Space.” He regularly seeks out evil and squashes it with sometimes nothing more than his superior intellect and a sonic screwdriver. Yes, very much a science-fiction program, but in the BBC show’s rich 54-year history, it has run the gamut of genres. The following are some of the best recent offerings of mystery and horror:

[Let's travel back in time...]

Tue
Feb 14 2017 1:00pm

The Dark Tower: Wizard and Glass, Part VI

Last week, the tension built as the man in black showed up in Mejis. This week, plans are set in motion as we move towards a final showdown. 

Thank you for joining me on a journey of Stephen King’s Wizard and Glass (1997), the 4th book in The Dark Tower series. When we left Roland, Jake, Susannah, Eddie, and Oy the billy-bumbler, they were trapped on the psychotic locomotive, Blaine the Mono, crossing through the feared waste lands. Our ka-tet had narrowly escaped the destruction of Lud that Blaine had decimated with gas—but for what? To become prisoners aboard a train bulleting into a desolate hell populated by fierce beasts, with a guide that’s clearly mad. Yeah, it looks like we are bound to have a helluva lot of fun as we continue our journey to the Dark Tower.

 *Remember: While this is a reread, please avoid spoilers in the comments. The point is to get there together!

We're back to wacky Stephen King chapters, so the plan is to read a section a week (about 100 pages) and meet here at our usual time (Tuesday at 12 p.m. ET) to discuss major themes, motifs, and reactions. Make sure to bookmark the HQ page for the schedule and links to all of the chapter discussions as they go live! This week, plans are set in motion and our ka-tet finds themselves arrested for treason. Join us in the comments for a discussion of Part VI of Wizard and Glass: Come, Reap: Chapter 5 “Wizard's Rainbow” – Chapter 7: “Taking the Ball”!


CrimeHQ's The Dark Tower Reread


[There's gonna be a showdown...]

Thu
Feb 9 2017 4:30pm

Review: Zodiac by Sam Wilson

Zodiac by Sam Wilson is a startling new thriller with one of the most original concepts in years, where the line between a life of luxury and an existence of poverty can be determined by the stroke of midnight.

Here's an offbeat dystopian premise: a society divided and governed by Zodiac signs, where all walks of life—from the top-tier elites right down to the bottom-rung proletariats—are viewed through the prism of the astrological sign under which they are born that binds them to their particular lot in life. 

Our story opens in the city of San Celeste with Rachel, one of the working class who is employed by JiffyMaids. She arrives at the house where she is scheduled to clean and stops cold in her tracks when she notices the door has been forced open. She dials 911, and the dispatcher—who Rachel is glad to hear is a Libra—instructs her to stay put.

[Read David Cranmer's review of Zodiac...]

Tue
Feb 7 2017 3:00pm

Review: The Nightwalker by Sebastian Fitzek

The Nightwalker by Sebastian Fitzek is a psychological thrill-ride of a novel that finds an insomniac wondering if his nighttime excursions have turned into something beyond his imagination.

Architect Leon Nader is a 28-year-old insomniac, and it’s a vast understatement to say the condition is wreaking havoc on his life. As Sebastian Fitzek’s The Nightwalker opens, Leon’s wife Natalie is leaving him. He begs her to reconsider, but she exits their apartment and their life. She takes the elevator, but when it opens on the ground floor—Leon ran the stairs in a last ditch attempt at reconciliation—it’s empty. 

Later, he calls his parents to see if they have heard from Natalie, but they are away on a cruise. The quirky couple left a message on their answering machine bragging that their trip had been paid in full by their son—a confused Leon never gifted them such a present.

[Read David Cranmer's review of The Nightwalker...]

Tue
Feb 7 2017 1:00pm

The Dark Tower: Wizard and Glass, Part V

Last week, true intentions surfaced and a forbidden love was consummated. This week, tension builds as the man in black shows up in Mejis and the ka-tet's trust and friendship is tested. 

Thank you for joining me on a journey of Stephen King’s Wizard and Glass (1997), the 4th book in The Dark Tower series. When we left Roland, Jake, Susannah, Eddie, and Oy the billy-bumbler, they were trapped on the psychotic locomotive, Blaine the Mono, crossing through the feared waste lands. Our ka-tet had narrowly escaped the destruction of Lud that Blaine had decimated with gas—but for what? To become prisoners aboard a train bulleting into a desolate hell populated by fierce beasts, with a guide that’s clearly mad. Yeah, it looks like we are bound to have a helluva lot of fun as we continue our journey to the Dark Tower.

 *Remember: While this is a reread, please avoid spoilers in the comments. The point is to get there together!

We're back to wacky Stephen King chapters, so the plan is to read a section a week (about 100 pages) and meet here at our usual time (Tuesday at 12 p.m. ET) to discuss major themes, motifs, and reactions. Make sure to bookmark the HQ page for the schedule and links to all of the chapter discussions as they go live! This week, the tension reaches its boiling point as the man in black shows up in Mejis and our ka-tet seems splintered. Join us in the comments for a discussion of Part V of Wizard and Glass: Come, Reap: Chapter 1 “Beneath the Huntress Moon” – Chapter 4: “Roland and Cuthbert”!


CrimeHQ's The Dark Tower Reread


[“Call me Walter,” the man in black said...]

Tue
Jan 31 2017 3:00pm

Review: Winterlong by Mason Cross

Winterlong by Mason Cross is the 3rd book in the Carter Blake thriller series and a deadly game of cat and mouse filled with high stakes tension (available February 7, 2017).

A secret US-based military organization is on a deadly mission to close out an at-large loose end. The newly appointed head of this clandestine unit, Emma Faraday, browses the file of their target.

The green eyes stared back at her from the DMV photograph, as though aware of her gaze.

The subject had the ideal skill set for the work they did. An expert tracker, good with people in every way that mattered, above average on the firing range, adept in unarmed combat. A strategic thinker, too, able to respond creatively to changing conditions on the ground. Both a thinker and a warrior. Carter Blake would be a perfect asset, if she were recruiting.

But more likely, within thirty-six hours, he would be dead.

Blake is accused of killing a United States senator and his wife over a “botched deal to leak sensitive files.” Faraday briefs twelve assassins on the Blake file, and—here’s the kick—he used to be employed by Faraday’s group so he knows a thing or two about the hell descending on him and what it will take to survive against the odds. Winterlong’s back blurb sums it up: “If there’s anyone who can find him—and kill him—it’s them.”

[Read David Cranmer's review of Winterlong...]

Tue
Jan 31 2017 1:00pm

The Dark Tower: Wizard and Glass, Part IV

Last week, Roland and Susan struggled with their feelings for each other. This week, secrets abound as the gunslingers learn of Farson's plan in Mejis, the Big Coffin Hunters learn of the gunslingers true background, and Roland and Susan throw caution to the wind by consummating their forbidden love

Thank you for joining me on a journey of Stephen King’s Wizard and Glass (1997), the 4th book in The Dark Tower series. When we left Roland, Jake, Susannah, Eddie, and Oy the billy-bumbler, they were trapped on the psychotic locomotive, Blaine the Mono, crossing through the feared waste lands. Our ka-tet had narrowly escaped the destruction of Lud that Blaine had decimated with gas—but for what? To become prisoners aboard a train bulleting into a desolate hell populated by fierce beasts, with a guide that’s clearly mad. Yeah, it looks like we are bound to have a helluva lot of fun as we continue our journey to the Dark Tower.

 *Remember: While this is a reread, please avoid spoilers in the comments. The point is to get there together!

We're back to wacky Stephen King chapters, so the plan is to read a section a week (about 100 pages) and meet here at our usual time (Tuesday at 12 p.m. ET) to discuss major themes, motifs, and reactions. Make sure to bookmark the HQ page for the schedule and links to all of the chapter discussions as they go live! This week, secrets abound as the tension builds all around Mejis. Join us in the comments for a discussion of Part IV of Wizard and Glass: Susan: Chapter 8 “Beneath the Peddler's Moon” – Interlude: “Kansas, Somewhere, Somewhen”!


CrimeHQ's The Dark Tower Reread


[Secrets, secrets are no fun...]

Tue
Jan 24 2017 1:00pm

The Dark Tower: Wizard and Glass, Part III

Last week, we traveled back to Mejis to learn of Roland's backstory. This week, the romance between Roland and Susan flourishes as we meet our villains: The Big Coffin Hunters

Thank you for joining me on a journey of Stephen King’s Wizard and Glass (1997), the 4th book in The Dark Tower series. When we left Roland, Jake, Susannah, Eddie, and Oy the billy-bumbler, they were trapped on the psychotic locomotive, Blaine the Mono, crossing through the feared waste lands. Our ka-tet had narrowly escaped the destruction of Lud that Blaine had decimated with gas—but for what? To become prisoners aboard a train bulleting into a desolate hell populated by fierce beasts, with a guide that’s clearly mad. Yeah, it looks like we are bound to have a helluva lot of fun as we continue our journey to the Dark Tower.

 *Remember: While this is a reread, please avoid spoilers in the comments. The point is to get there together!

We're back to wacky Stephen King chapters, so the plan is to read a section a week (about 100 pages) and meet here at our usual time (Tuesday at 12 p.m. ET) to discuss major themes, motifs, and reactions. Make sure to bookmark the HQ page for the schedule and links to all of the chapter discussions as they go live! This week, Roland falls hard for Susan as we meet our villains: The Big Coffin Hunters. Join us in the comments for a discussion of Part III of Wizard and Glass: Susan: Chapter 5 “Welcome to Town” – Chapter 7 “On the Drop”!


CrimeHQ's The Dark Tower Reread


[Introducing The Big Coffin Hunters...]

Tue
Jan 17 2017 1:00pm

The Dark Tower: Wizard and Glass, Part II

Last week, we began Wizard and Glass by defeating Blaine the Mono and ending up in some when's Topeka, Kansas. This week, we begin Roland's backstory in Mejis and meet the beautiful Susan Delgado

Thank you for joining me on a journey of Stephen King’s Wizard and Glass (1997), the 4th book in The Dark Tower series. When we left Roland, Jake, Susannah, Eddie, and Oy the billy-bumbler, they were trapped on the psychotic locomotive, Blaine the Mono, crossing through the feared waste lands. Our ka-tet had narrowly escaped the destruction of Lud that Blaine had decimated with gas—but for what? To become prisoners aboard a train bulleting into a desolate hell populated by fierce beasts, with a guide that’s clearly mad. Yeah, it looks like we are bound to have a helluva lot of fun as we continue our journey to the Dark Tower.

 *Remember: While this is a reread, please avoid spoilers in the comments. The point is to get there together!

We're back to wacky Stephen King chapters, so the plan is to read a section a week (about 100 pages) and meet here at our usual time (Tuesday at 12 p.m. ET) to discuss major themes, motifs, and reactions. Make sure to bookmark the HQ page for the schedule and links to all of the chapter discussions as they go live! This week, we begin Roland's backstory in Mejis and finally meet the beautiful Susan Delgado. Join us in the comments for a discussion of Part II of Wizard and Glass: Susan: Chapter 1 “Beneath the Kissing Moon” – Chapter 4 “Long After Moonset”!


CrimeHQ's The Dark Tower Reread


[Introducing the beautiful Susan Delgado...]