Fresh Meat: <i>Death Is Like a Box of Chocolates</i> by Kathy Aarons Fresh Meat: Death Is Like a Box of Chocolates by Kathy Aarons Terrie Farley Moran Murder is like chocolate. You can never just have one. Fresh Meat: <i>Fall of Night</i> by Jonathan Maberry Fresh Meat: Fall of Night by Jonathan Maberry Katherine Tomlinson Parents aren't supposed to eat their children... FM: <i>The Skeleton Takes a Bow</i> by Leigh Perry FM: The Skeleton Takes a Bow by Leigh Perry Terrie Farley Moran Some people keep their skeletons in the closet. Others chose the attic. Fresh Meat: <i>Nasty</i> by Bret R. Wright Fresh Meat: Nasty by Bret R. Wright Debbie Meldrum Nate "Nasty" Jepson catches cheating spouses, but a grisly murder leaves him reeling...
From The Blog
August 30, 2014
Historical Crime Fiction: Writing the Lives of the Erased
Lyndsay Faye
August 28, 2014
Horns Trailer
Crime HQ
August 27, 2014
Toy Lightsaber Causes Bomb Scare
Teddy Pierson
August 26, 2014
Before Hannibal Lecter, There was Thomas Bishop: Shane Stevens' Forgotten Killer
Chad Eagleton
August 22, 2014
Checking into The Knick 1.03: "The Busy Flea"
Joe Brosnan
Showing posts by: Ania Ahlborn click to see Ania Ahlborn's profile
Tue
Nov 27 2012 1:00pm

The Neighbors: New Excerpt

The Neighbors by Ania AhlbornThe Neighbors by Ania Ahlborn is a psychological suspense novel cum horror story about, as they say, what lies beneath (available November 27, 2012).

Andrew Morrison sacrificed everything—his childhood, his education, and the girl of his dreams—to look after his alcoholic mother. But enough is enough, and now he’s determined to get out and live his life. That means trading the home he grew up in for a rented room in the house of an old childhood friend—both of which are in sorry shape.

The only thing worse than Drew’s squalid new digs and sullen new roommate is the envy he feels for the house next door: a picture-perfect suburban domicile straight out of Norman Rockwell, with a couple of happy householders to match. But the better acquainted he gets with his new neighbors—especially the sweet and sexy Harlow Ward—the more he suspects unspeakable darkness beyond the white picket fence.

Chapter 6 (Excerpt)

The headlights of the TransAm cut through the darkness, casting weird shadows across the face of the house. Drew had nursed the day’s wounds by watching talk shows and reality TV all afternoon when he should have been applying for work at gas stations and truck stops, but the bitter blow of countless nos had temporarily grounded him.

Mickey dragged himself through the door, and though he’d been gone the entire day, his appearance offered no clue where he had been. There was no uniform to suggest a day of work, no duffel bag or water bottle to suggest time spent at the gym.

[Read the full excerpt of Chapter 6 of The Neighbors by Ania Ahlborn]

Wed
Nov 14 2012 10:30am

Serial Killers: Fascination or Fear?

Silence of the Lambs (1991)Once that you’ve decided on a killing
First you make a stone of your heart
And if you find that your hands are still willing
Then you can turn a murder into art

—“Murder by Numbers,” The Police

Why are we so fascinated by serial killers? I’ll be the first to admit it; I am, and I have been for as long as I can remember. While attending university, my first major (before I dropped it) was psychology, but I wasn’t interested in just any old psychoanalysis. I wanted to study the truly twisted, the spree killers, the mass murderers. I wanted to crawl inside the heads of monsters, pick apart their childhoods, piece together how an ordinary human being could become so, well, extraordinary.

We’re so rapt by serial killers that we spend billions of dollars per year to watch them do their bidding on the big screen. Movies like Silence of the Lambs and Seven are considered classics, and Dexter is currently one of the most popular shows on television—a show about a normal guy who considers murder little more than overtime. Bret Easton Ellis’s American Psycho was so gory it made me physically ill when I read it, but I paid my admission and went to see it in the theatre when they turned it into a movie anyway. And let’s not forget Holden Caulfield, J.D. Salinger’s brainchild, who made us hold our breath as we waited to see if he’d pulled the trigger, waiting to see if the kid would snap and go insane.

[We like to watch...]

Fri
Oct 26 2012 1:00pm

The 1950s: Death and the American Dream

I’ve always been intrigued by the 1950s. On one hand, you’ve got poodle skirts and soda shops and greaser guys in fast cars and leather jackets; on the other, there’s Mom, her full-skirted dress pulling freshly baked cookies out of the oven just as Dad walks in the door with a big smile and a briefcase in hand. The ’50s were an idyllic age, an atomic age where wholesome values and classic Americana was king. And that’s exactly why I find the 1950s so damn creepy.

[The Fonz wouldn’t have thought it was creepy...]

Wed
Oct 17 2012 10:30am

Mailboxes: A Sinister Post

I live in a relatively quiet neighborhood. We’re talking a lights-out-at-nine kind of place. The houses are sleepy, the lawns decently kempt, everyone’s sprinklers go off at exactly the same time each evening, neighbors wave to one another and smile while standing in the driveway and washing their cars. Everything is kept neat and tidy beneath a cozy comforter of normalcy, but normalcy is the perfect breeding ground for monsters.

[Is the mailbox trying to tell the neighbors something?]