Review: <i>Fantasy in Death</i> by J.D. Robb Review: Fantasy in Death by J.D. Robb Meghan Harker Read Meghan Harker's review! <i>A Death at the Yoga Cafe</i>: New Excerpt A Death at the Yoga Cafe: New Excerpt Michelle Kelly The 2nd book in the Keeley Carpenter series. Review: <i>Kindred in Death</i> by J.D. Robb Review: Kindred in Death by J.D. Robb Dirk Robertson Read Dirk Robertson's review! The Dark Tower: <i>Wizard and Glass</i>, Part II The Dark Tower: Wizard and Glass, Part II David Cranmer Join the discussion!
From The Blog
January 17, 2017
2017 Left Coast Crime "Lefty" Awards Nominations
Crime HQ
January 14, 2017
Discount: The Advocate's Daughter by Anthony Franze
Crime HQ
January 13, 2017
5 Gateway Marvel Comics for Crime Fiction Fans
Dave Richards
January 10, 2017
Into the Woods and Off the Grid: Three Profiles
Erica Ferencik
January 9, 2017
Historical Novels: Fact vs. Fiction
Nicola Cornick
Showing posts tagged: In Death series click to see more stuff tagged with In Death series
Wed
Jan 18 2017 1:00pm

Review: Fantasy in Death by J.D. Robb

To celebrate the upcoming release of J.D. Robb's 44th Eve Dallas mystery, Echoes in Death, we're taking a look back at every single book in the In Death series. Today, Meghan Harker reviews #30, Fantasy in Death.

Sometimes, escapism is all we’ve got. Departure from reality—immersing yourself in another world, in another self—can be a coping mechanism for dealing with the scary things in reality. It’s a chance to regroup. Sometimes, it’s exploring a different side of yourself. For Bart Minnock, turning his love of gaming into a ground-breaking, multi-million dollar business is a dream come true. But his fantasy derails when he’s found dead, locked in his holo-room, decapitated, and with no sign of foul play.

Lieutenant Eve Dallas has her work cut out for her. No one appears to have any problems with the victim, but people don’t lose their heads over nothing, and Eve’s convinced the whole setup is more than just a game.

[Read Meghan Harker's review of Fantasy in Death...]

Tue
Jan 17 2017 1:00pm

Review: Kindred in Death by J.D. Robb

To celebrate the upcoming release of J.D. Robb's 44th Eve Dallas mystery, Echoes in Death, we're taking a look back at every single book in the In Death series. Today, Dirk Robertson reviews #29, Kindred in Death.

Eve and Roarke have just made love and are having a bit of breakfast in bed when they’re joined by the cat, who waited a respectful length of time before joining them. What is there not like about that? Peaceful, relaxed, and fulfilled—gentle things going on as they think about getting ready for a quick jaunt to the Cayman Islands to check out the possible purchase of a villa. 

But reality has another agenda as a communicator summons her to pick up and read the display. It’s from Whitney. Now she is no longer Roarke’s lover, pet afficiando, and person who was about to jet off to the Caymans—she is Lieutenant Eve Dallas, and it is time for another case. 

Instead of boarding a plane for the sun, she has to go to 541 Central Park South. A victim awaits her: Deena Macmasters, sixteen, found dead by her parents when they came back from a weekend trip. It doesn’t get any worse. Parents should never have to bury their children under any circumstances. 

[Read Dirk Robertson's review of Kindred in Death...]

Mon
Jan 16 2017 1:00pm

Review: Promises in Death by J.D. Robb

To celebrate the upcoming release of J.D. Robb's 44th Eve Dallas mystery, Echoes in Death, we're taking a look back at every single book in the In Death series. Today, Amber Keller reviews #28, Promises in Death.

In a more solemn entry in the series, book number 28, Promises in Death, sees a fellow cop at the New York Police and Security Department murdered.

Now, Lieutenant Eve Dallas is no stranger to death, or even death that hits close to home, but when it’s one of her own, it changes the game. Amaryllis Coltraine—a recent transfer to the department from Atlanta, Georgia—falls victim to homicide. Her death shakes up the force, and seeing that she is the girlfriend of Dallas’s good friend and fellow co-worker, the Chief Medical Examiner Morris, she makes it her mission to find out who killed her.

The investigation does not come easy, and Dallas struggles to fit the pieces together. Along the way, we have the added benefit of classic scenes involving Dallas and Roarke to carry us through this tragedy as she figures out the killer. Their interactions are always a favorite for me, as they bring a necessary element out of Dallas. She seems so hard-assed and hellbent on solving crimes that it can be easy to forget there’s a loving side to her, as well. We learn more about Dallas during her times with Roarke than we do watching her at her job, which she’s brilliant at. Also, their relationship is truly one for the records. The love they have for each other seems to be endless, and Roarke’s support and even participation in Dallas’s job goes above and beyond.

[Read Amber Keller's review of Promises in Death...]

Fri
Jan 13 2017 1:00pm

Review: Salvation in Death by J.D. Robb

To celebrate the upcoming release of J.D. Robb's 44th Eve Dallas mystery, Echoes in Death, we're taking a look back at every single book in the In Death series. Today, Kristen Houghton reviews #27, Salvation in Death.

Hector Ortiz had been a good man. He had lived for a hundred and sixteen years, and his large family and many friends were gathered for his funeral mass. At St. Cristóbal’s Church, the priest officiated with the dignity and respect Señor Ortiz deserved.

But while Father Flores is performing the Rite of Communion at the mass, he suddenly and unexpectedly dies on the altar. This is no death related to natural causes; it is a murder. Someone has spiked the communion wine with poison, causing the priest to die in front of a church filled with mourners. 

Miguel was officiating the funeral mass, and was taking Communion. He drank, and he seemed, almost immediately, to seize. His body shook, and he gasped for air. And he collapsed.” López spoke with the faintest of accents, an exotic sheen over rough wood.

[Read Kristen Houghton's review of Salvation in Death...]

Thu
Jan 12 2017 1:00pm

Review: Strangers in Death by J.D. Robb

To celebrate the upcoming release of J.D. Robb's 44th Eve Dallas mystery, Echoes in Death, we're taking a look back at every single book in the In Death series. Today, Jenny Maloney reviews #26, Strangers in Death.

Thomas Anders—wealthy businessman and family man—is found tied up and strangled with black velvet ropes in his Park Avenue apartment. His general popularity and the salaciousness of his murder combine to create a perfect storm of a public relations nightmare for Lieutenant Eve Dallas. Dallas throws the tricky work of controlling the press to her partner, Detective Delia Peabody, tossing the less experienced detective into the deep end of media interviews while Dallas handles the strange details of the case itself.

And the details are, indeed, strange. At first, it seems like something kinky gone wrong, considering the—ahem—position the body was found in: naked, tied to the bed, and surrounded by naughty adult toys. Nothing, however, is what it seems in Dallas’s world. By all accounts, Thomas Anders was a loving husband in a good marriage. No one seems to want to do him harm. 

Plus, for such a seemingly intimate crime, there are hallmarks of an organized personality behind it. Nothing is ever easy.

[Read Jenny Maloney's review of Strangers in Death...]

Wed
Jan 11 2017 3:30pm

Echoes in Death by J.D. Robb: A Visual Guide

GIFnotes: Giving you the basic plot summary of an upcoming book with the help of the Graphics Interchange Format.

This week, we jump into the future of police work with J.D. Robb's 44th In Death novel featuring Eve Dallas, Echoes in Death. Take a visual tour with GIFnotes!

[Like CliffsNotes, but more fun...]

Wed
Jan 11 2017 1:00pm

Review: Creation in Death by J.D. Robb

To celebrate the upcoming release of J.D. Robb's 44th Eve Dallas mystery, Echoes in Death, we're taking a look back at every single book in the In Death series. Today, David Cranmer reviews #25, Creation in Death.

It’s March of 2060, and Lieutenant Eve Dallas has a rare couple of days off. She’s enjoying a movie with Roarke and has no other plans except to “nail her husband like an air jack” after the video ends. But before they can consummate the evening on such a candid note, Eve gets a call from her commander directing her to a homicide. Roarke asks to tag along—as he often does—promising to stay out of the way, and what they find is revolting:

It might have been a sheet of ice or snow. From a distance, it might appear to be. And from a distance, the body arranged on it might appear to be artful—a model for some edgy shoot.

But she knew what it was, even from a distance, and the line of cold up her spine took on teeth.

Her eyes met Morris’s. But they said nothing.

It wasn’t ice, or snow. She wasn’t a model or a piece of art.

The victim is identified as 28-year-old Sarifina York, and in a rather too convenient plot twist, Roarke is acquainted with the young woman, having hired her to manage a club.

But her killer is no stranger, per se, either. He’s is well known to Eve from several unsolved murders dating nine years back and has been dubbed “The Groom” because of his signature calling card: a ring that he places on the deceased’s finger. Sprinkled throughout the novel, we are privy to The Groom’s disturbed mind. He considers what he’s doing an art form, and he carves into the skin of his captives how long they survived, right down to the second. The prologue for Creation in Death sums up the clinical, psychotic killer that Lieutenant Eve Dallas is up against with this go around.

Death was, in and of itself, the all.

He considered himself a late bloomer, and often bemoaned the years before he’d found his raison d’être. All that time lost, all those opportunities missed. But still, he had bloomed, and was forever grateful that he had finally looked inside himself and seen what he was. What he was meant for.

He was a maestro in the art of death. The keeper of time. The bringer of destiny.

Antagonists of this nature—the kind of serial killers that deem themselves erudite with fine taste—always reminds me of the big dog on the front porch, Hannibal Lecter. In particular, The Silence of the Lambs by Thomas Harris is the standard by which I govern their ilk. Though “The Groom” is not as original as “Hannibal the Cannibal,” he’s nevertheless a worthy adversary as he begins circling closer and closer to Eve, intent on making her his last victim … and his ultimate creation.

As in all the In Death books, focus is squarely on hardboiled Eve Dallas, who has gone from being a loner in the earlier part of the series to being surrounded by a loyal group of supporters, like the ever-ready Peabody and billionaire husband Roarke, who I’ve always pictured as Lee Horsley from the Matt Houston series. A super rich dude who never lost the connection to the common man and has the grit that a tough-as-nails cop like Eve can respect. Whether she likes to admit it or not, he grounds her and makes her a more sympathetic person.

An excellent futuristic crime procedural, but don’t take my word for it. Stephen King said, “If you haven’t read Robb, this is a great place to start.” And from the late Robert B. Parker, “Creation in Death is a complete pleasure. WONDERFUL!”

 

To learn more or order a copy, visit:

Buy at iTunes

Buy at Barnes and NobleBuy at Amazon

 

 


David Cranmer is the publisher and editor of BEAT to a PULP. Latest books from this indie powerhouse include the alternate history novella Leviathan and sci-fi adventure Pale Mars. David lives in New York with his wife and daughter.

Tue
Jan 10 2017 1:00pm

Review: Innocent in Death by J.D. Robb

To celebrate the upcoming release of J.D. Robb's 44th Eve Dallas mystery, Echoes in Death, we're taking a look back at every single book in the In Death series. Today, David Cranmer reviews #24, Innocent in Death.

A young, seemingly healthy history teacher, Craig Foster, dies at work while eating lunch alone in his classroom. Craig was recently married to a woman named Lissette and, according to his co-workers and the student body, was a beloved educator. Lieutenant Eve Dallas and her assistant Peabody are called to investigate.

Spider legs of broken vessels ran through the whites of his eyes. There were traces of foam as well as vomit clinging to his lips. “Tried to crawl after it hit him,” she murmured. “Tried to crawl for the door. Get the formal ID, Peabody, verify TOD.”

Rising, Eve moved carefully around the puddles of what Craig's body had voided, and picked up the insulated cup she saw, which had his name engraved in silver over black. Sniffed.

“You think somebody poisoned this guy?” Peabody asked.

[Read David Cranmer's review of Innocent in Death...]

Mon
Jan 9 2017 1:00pm

Review: Born in Death by J.D. Robb

To celebrate the upcoming release of J.D. Robb's 44th Eve Dallas mystery, Echoes in Death, we're taking a look back at every single book in the In Death series. Today, Leigh Neely reviews #23, Born in Death.

I freely admit that I avoided this series for several years. I was in my romantic era at the time and didn’t think I would enjoy this break from my favorite romance author. However, my best friend continued to urge me to try reading them, and I finally got a paperback copy of Naked in Death. I never looked back. I’ve been reading them ever since, and I always buy the hardback on release day. That’s why I’m so excited to be reviewing Born in Death.

These stories focus on Lieutenant Eve Dallas of the NYPSD, and by now, she is married to the unbelievably handsome Roarke, one of the richest men in the universe. The life Robb has created for Eve Dallas is one we all dream of: a husband who is literally rich enough to buy you a world, a job you love and can be totally immersed in with support from your husband, a castle-like home in the heart of New York City, and the autochef that dispenses whatever food you want whenever you want it.

[Read Leigh Neely's review of Born in Death...]

Fri
Jan 6 2017 1:00pm

Review: Memory in Death by J.D. Robb

To celebrate the upcoming release of J.D. Robb's 44th Eve Dallas mystery, Echoes in Death, we're taking a look back at every single book in the In Death series. Today, Kristen Houghton reviews #22, Memory in Death.

If you’ve had a childhood as bad as Lt. Eve Dallas, the last person you want to see during the holiday season is the foster “mother” who made your life hell during the time you were in her “care.”

Eve’s got enough on her hands as the story opens, what with an office-party Santa falling out of a 36th-story window and killing an innocent bystander below. Ol’ Saint Nick was high on drugs when he took the header out the window. 

Lt. Dallas of the New York Police and Security Department promptly finds and arrests the dealer and returns to her precinct where she is met by a woman named Trudy Lombard. This unwelcome Ghost of Christmas Past is the foster mother who terrorized an eight-year-old Eve back in Texas. The abuse continued until Eve escaped by running away. 

[Read Kristen Houghton's review of Memory in Death...]

Thu
Jan 5 2017 1:00pm

Review: Origin in Death by J.D. Robb

To celebrate the upcoming release of J.D. Robb's 44th Eve Dallas mystery, Echoes in Death, we're taking a look back at every single book in the In Death series. Today, Jenny Maloney reviews #21, Origin in Death.

Dr. Wilfred B. Icove, Sr. is perfect on paper—which makes sense for a doctor dedicated to making other people “perfect” via cosmetic surgery. He has no outstanding bank accounts, a smaller-than-average number of malpractice suits in his long career, and a loving family. His clients come out of his office with robust busts, pert noses, and svelte waistlines. So, when he’s stabbed in the heart with a scalpel, it comes as quite a surprise. 

And Eve Dallas is convinced Icove’s perfect persona is a front for some other, darker second life. After all, no one is perfect. When she’s stonewalled with Icove’s records, Dallas turns to husband/crime-fighting partner Roarke. Together they break through Icove’s coded records and find that Icove is, indeed, searching for perfection—in the most inhumane, imperfect way possible. 

[Read Jenny Maloney's review of Origin in Death...]

Wed
Jan 4 2017 1:00pm

Review: Survivor in Death by J.D. Robb

To celebrate the upcoming release of J.D. Robb's 44th Eve Dallas mystery, Echoes in Death, we're taking a look back at every single book in the In Death series. Today, Debbie Meldrum reviews #20, Survivor in Death.

Nixie Swisher’s best friend Linnie is getting to spend the night in the middle of the week while Linnie’s parents celebrate their wedding anniversary. When Nixie wakes up in the middle of night, craving a forbidden cold drink, Linnie isn’t interested in joining her. Downstairs, two masked and armed men in black break into the house and kill everyone except the hiding nine year old.

While Lieutenant Eve Dallas is fully equipped to investigate the murders, she has nothing to fall back on when handling a devastated little girl. The family appears to have been a normal, happy, middle-class family. The housekeeper who was also killed may have just been collateral damage. And poor Linnie was mistaken for Nixie.

The precision of the attack leaves little doubt that the killers will come after Nixie if they realize their mistake. And Eve is not about to let that happen. Going around the Child Protection System means the little girl will have to be put in the safest place Eve knows of—her own home. The one Nixie calls a castle when she first sees it.

[Read Debbie Meldrum's review of Survivor in Death...]

Tue
Jan 3 2017 1:00pm

Review: Visions in Death by J.D. Robb

To celebrate the upcoming release of J.D. Robb's 44th Eve Dallas mystery, Echoes in Death, we're taking a look back at every single book in the In Death series. Today, Amber Keller reviews #19, Visions in Death.

The 19th book in the In Death series has Lieutenant Eve Dallas searching for one twisted murderer.

It’s just another day in the life of Eve Dallas when the chaotic monotony is broken by a horrific crime. A woman’s body is found brutally beaten, raped, and missing the eyes. Soon after, another death with the same MO is discovered. The nature of these crimes dredge up terrible memories for Dallas, and she must face them while she hunts for the killer before he can strike again.

Dallas is known for her strength and abilities, all wrapped up in a tiny package. But she’s even stronger than most realize, and she’s got some major demons in her past. She’s almost as well known for her ruthless capabilities as she is for being married to high-society Roarke.

[Read Amber Keller's review of Visions in Death...]

Mon
Jan 2 2017 1:00pm

Review: Divided in Death by J.D. Robb

To celebrate the upcoming release of J.D. Robb's 44th Eve Dallas mystery, Echoes in Death, we're taking a look back at every single book in the In Death series. Today, Debbie Meldrum reviews #18, Divided in Death.

I’ve heard great things about Nora Roberts/J.D. Robb’s books but had not read any before this one. Dropping in this far into the series left me a bit confused, at first, but simply flipping to the back cover helped. This is the near-future and, while technology has made great leaps forward, some humans still have a long way to go.

Lieutenant Eve Dallas has just enjoyed a romantic reunion with husband Roarke, who has been away on business. He receives a call from his assistant, Caro. It seems her daughter—also an employee of Roarke’s—found her husband and best friend in bed at her friend’s home. Both are dead. Worse yet, Reva Ewing had gone to confront the two of them. She meant to override the security system, but found it already off when she got there.

She could see the two figures huddled together under the silk and lace coverlet. They’d fallen asleep, she thought bitterly. All cozy and warm from sex.

Their clothes were tossed over a chair, messily, as if they’d been in a hurry to start. Seeing them, the tangle of clothes, broke her heart in hundreds of places.

Bracing against it, she strode to the bed, gripped the stunner in her hand. “Wake-up call, you piss-buckets.”

And whipped the silk and lace cover away.

The blood. Oh my God, the blood. The sight of it all over flesh, all over the sheets, made her head spin. The sudden smell of it, of death, mixed with the scents of flowers and candles, made her gag and stumble back.

[Read Debbie Meldrum's review of Divided in Death...]

Fri
Dec 30 2016 1:00pm

Review: Imitation in Death by J.D. Robb

To celebrate the upcoming release of J.D. Robb's 44th Eve Dallas mystery, Echoes in Death, we're taking a look back at every single book in the In Death series. Today, John Valeri reviews #17, Imitation in Death.

Criminal Element’s commitment to reviewing each of J.D. Robb’s forty-three Eve Dallas novels in anticipation of the forthcoming Echoes in Death (out February 7th) provided me with a rare experience: to read an established author for the very first time midway through a phenomenally popular and successful series. 

To say that Nora Roberts, and her much darker literary alter ego J.D. Robb, has been on my radar would be an understatement. That my introduction to her work would come via Imitation in Death—a seductive whodunit that focuses on a cunning copycat killer recreating some of history’s most notorious crimes—strikes me as appropriate, given my decades-long fascination with the macabre and an unabashed love of such genre books that meld fiction with fact.

[Read John Valeri's review of Imitation in Death...]

Thu
Dec 29 2016 1:00pm

Review: Portrait in Death by J.D. Robb

To celebrate the upcoming release of J.D. Robb's 44th Eve Dallas mystery, Echoes in Death, we're taking a look back at every single book in the In Death series. Today, Meghan Harker reviews #16, Portrait in Death.

Though I’m getting better at reading outside my usual genres, I typically stick to historical settings, fantasy, or horror when looking for a new fiction book to devour. Portrait in Death—the 16th book in J.D. Robb’s In Death series—dragged me out of that comfort zone and unexpectedly flung me into the future. 

A letter and a portrait arrive on the desk of a reporter at Channel 75, and the first hint at a possible homicide has Lieutenant Eve Dallas itching. When Rachel Howard is found discarded in a dumpster, she realizes she's got her work cut out for her. A series of letters and portraits—and ultimately corpses—sets her on the trail of an artist, a perfectionist, and a serial killer obsessed with capturing the light of his victims with his lens.

Before I began reading, I had no idea this series was set in the year 2058, and therefore had a considerable learning curve regarding the jargon and futuristic things. I got the hang of it pretty quick; one of the things I appreciate about the series is the ability to come in halfway through and feel like you haven’t missed a thing. I’m can’t say if that rings true for all the books in this series, but it did for Portrait in Death

[Read Meghan Harker's review of Portrait in Death...]

Wed
Dec 28 2016 1:00pm

Review: Purity in Death by J.D. Robb

To celebrate the upcoming release of J.D. Robb's 44th Eve Dallas mystery, Echoes in Death, we're taking a look back at every single book in the In Death series. Today, David Cranmer reviews #15, Purity in Death.

Lieutenant Eve Dallas of Cop Central is preparing to attend an evening soirée with her husband, Roarke, who’s rich enough “to buy a couple of continents.” But she is relieved of the snooty affair when she’s notified that one of her men, off-duty Officer Troy Trueheart, has shot and killed a man named Louis K. Cogburn. Screaming about the spikes in his head, Cogburn took a baseball bat to his neighbor Ralph Wooster, beat him to death, and then went swinging after Wooster’s girlfriend, Suzanne. By the time Eve and her assistant Peabody arrive at the apartment building, they discover:

Two men lay sprawled in the corridor, one of them facedown in a pool of congealing blood. 

The other was faceup, staring with some surprise at the ceiling. Through an open doorway beside the bodies she could hear the sounds of weeping and groaning. 

The door across was also open. She noted several fresh holes and dents in the hallway walls, splinters of wallboard, splatters of blood. And what had once been a baseball bat was now a broken club, covered with blood and brain matter.

[Read David Cranmer's review of Purity in Death...]

Tue
Dec 27 2016 1:00pm

Review: Reunion in Death by J.D. Robb

To celebrate the upcoming release of J.D. Robb's 44th Eve Dallas mystery, Echoes in Death, we're taking a look back at every single book in the In Death series. Today, Kristen Houghton reviews #14, Reunion in Death.

Lt. Eve Dallas is back in J.D. Robb's popular In Death series. This time, she’s facing a recently released murderer who is out to even the score with Eve. Early in her law enforcement career, Eve testified against the woman, and she hasn’t forgotten that the young lieutenant’s testimony was the final nail in the coffin. She plots a violent “reunion.” It turns out that the just-released killer has spent her years in lockup planning how to confuse, humiliate, and ultimately destroy Dallas. 

It begins with the poisoning of middle-aged, wealthy men in seemingly innocuous circumstances on Eve Dallas’s beat. 

Murder was work. Death was a serious chore for the killer, the victim, for the survivors. And for those who stood for the dead. Some went about the job devotedly, others carelessly.

And for some, murder was a labor of love.

[Read Kristen Houghton's review of Reunion in Death...]

Mon
Dec 26 2016 1:00pm

Review: Seduction in Death by J.D. Robb

To celebrate the upcoming release of J.D. Robb's 44th Eve Dallas mystery, Echoes in Death, we're taking a look back at every single book in the In Death series. Today, Dirk Robertson reviews #13, Seduction in Death.

There are certain firsts in life that you never forget: your first kiss, your first love, your first cream bun. For me, you can also add your first J.D. Robb book to that list. 

Seduction in Death moves along at a smooth and slick pace, as though it were gliding on a magnetic propulsion system, set as it is in a near future that still awaits us all. This is a fine offering in the In Death sagas, and it sees Detective Eve Dallas up against a particularly nasty killer or set of killers who target their vulnerable and lonely victims and murder them in what appears to be a kind of sport or competition. A sick crime, whether set in the future, present, or murky past. 

Eve Dallas has a dark past—one that never seems far behind her, like a hellhound on her trail. Abuse and a dark family history that even Dickens would have been hard-pressed to create combine to form a character who takes no nonsense. We are all products of our childhood, and Detective Dallas is no different. She has a nose for the truly awful.

[Read Dirk Robertson's review of Seduction in Death...]

Fri
Dec 23 2016 1:00pm

Review: Betrayal in Death by J.D. Robb

To celebrate the upcoming release of J.D. Robb's 44th Eve Dallas mystery, Echoes in Death, we're taking a look back at every single book in the In Death series. Today, Janet Webb reviews #12, Betrayal in Death.

“Don’t get above your raisin,’” is a phrase common in the American South. How does it apply to the life and times of New York City billionaire Roarke and his wife Lieutenant Eve Dallas in the spring of 2059? A clue can be found in the title Betrayal in Death.

The feral, hungry youths—Roarke’s one time compatriots—of his mysterious Dublin past: do they feel abandoned by him, jealous of him? Eve is haunted by dreams of horrific abuse at the hands of her father: will she ever break free? 

A dead maid, raped and brutalized as she goes about her tasks in the luxurious Roarke Palace Hotel, is Eve’s newest victim. Roarke wishes anyone but Eve had the case.

[Read Janet Webb's review of Betrayal in Death...]